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Financial Services Law Insights and Observations

State Law Update: North Carolina, Connecticut, Ohio Update Banking, Mortgage Laws

Mortgage Licensing Bank Compliance

Lending

North Carolina Alters Mortgage Regulation Funding Mechanism. On June 20, North Carolina enacted Senate Bill 806, which creates a new funding mechanism for mortgage regulation. The new law replaces the current licensing fee, which offsets the state’s regulatory costs, with an assessment structure similar to the one currently applicable to banks. The change takes effect October 1, 2012.

Connecticut Enacts Bill to Update State Banking Laws. On June 8, Connecticut enacted Senate Bill 67, which makes numerous revisions to the state banking laws. Among the changes, the law (i) alters mortgage licensing requirements to exempt “housing finance agencies” and nonprofit groups, (ii) requires certain lender and broker employees to be licensed as mortgage loan originators, (iii) requires banks to review a mortgage loan before excusing the borrower from amortization of the principal, (iv) requires that banks consider an obligor’s credit exposure arising from a derivative transaction when determining the obligor’s liability limitations, (v) exempts from certain requirements “loan production offices.” The law also gives new investigatory powers to the state banking commissioner and allows the commissioner to require, without seeking a court order, restitution and disgorgement for banking law violations. Most of the law’s provisions take effect October 1, 2012.

Ohio Levels Playing Field for State Banks. Recently, Ohio Governor John Kasich signed House Bill 322, permits Ohio-chartered banks, savings banks, savings and loan associations, and credit unions to charge the same or lower rates or amounts of interest, fees, and other charges under a revolving credit agreement that their out-of-state counterparts may charge Ohio customers. The change does not apply to residential mortgages.  It takes effect September 4, 2012.

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