Skip to main content
Menu Icon Menu Icon
Close

InfoBytes Blog

Financial Services Law Insights and Observations

CFPB reports cover mortgage challenges, emergency savings

Federal Issues CFPB Covid-19 Consumer Finance Mortgages

Federal Issues

On March 23, the CFPB released two reports, New Data on the Characteristics of Mortgage Borrowers During the COVID-19 Pandemic and Emergency Savings and Financial Security: Insights from the Making Ends Meet Survey and Consumer Credit Panel. As previously covered by InfoBytes, the CFPB first released Characteristics of Mortgage Borrowers During the COVID-19 Pandemic in May 2021, which analyzed mortgage borrowers’ challenges due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. The recently released report explores the characteristics of borrowers who are delinquent or in forbearance based a sample of more than 2 million loans for owner-occupied properties. The report shows, among other things, that Black and Hispanic borrowers are more at risk of poor outcomes than others, as they comprised 31.2 percent of borrowers in forbearance while only constituting 18.2 percent of the overall sample of mortgage borrowers. The report also found that single borrower loans were approximately 1.6 times more likely to be in forbearance through January 2022, compared to loans with a co-borrower, which is an increase relative to March 2021, where single borrowers were only 1.4 times more likely to be in forbearance compared to co-borrowers.

The Emergency Savings and Financial Security Insights from the Making Ends Meet Survey and Consumer Credit Panel report examines how consumers’ financial profiles vary by levels of emergency savings. Using the Making Ends Meet survey and pairing it with credit bureau data from our Consumer Credit Panel, the report found that, among other things: (i) approximately 24 percent of consumers do not have savings set aside for emergencies, “while 39 percent have less than a month of income saved for emergencies and 37 percent have at least a month of income saved for emergencies,” and (ii) “41 percent of consumers with no more than a high school or vocational degree have no emergency savings, [while] the share is 6 percent for those with a college degree.”

Share page with AddThis