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  • Banking agencies issue final rule on private flood insurance

    Federal Issues

    On February 12, the Federal Reserve Board, Farm Credit Administration, FDIC, National Credit Union Administration, and the OCC issued a joint final rule amending regulations governing loans secured by properties in special flood hazard areas to implement the provisions of the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012 concerning private flood insurance. As previously covered by InfoBytes, the provisions, among other things, require regulated lending institutions to accept policies that meet the statutory definition of “private flood insurance,” and clarify that lending institutions may choose to accept private policies that do not meet the statutory criteria for “private flood insurance,” provided the policies meet certain criteria and the lending institutions document that the policies offer “sufficient protection for a designated loan, consistent with general safety and soundness principles.” The final rule takes effect July 1.

    (See also FDIC FIL-8-2019, NCUA press release, and OCC press release.)

    Federal Issues Federal Reserve OCC FDIC NCUA Farm Credit Administration Flood Insurance National Flood Insurance Act Flood Disaster Protection Act National Flood Insurance Program

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  • Federal Reserve releases CCAR scenarios; “less-complex” firms exempt from 2019 stress tests

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On February 5, the Federal Reserve Board (Fed) released the scenarios banks and supervisors will use to conduct the 2019 Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) and Dodd-Frank Act stress tests exercises for large bank holding companies and large U.S. operations of foreign firms. Each of the three scenarios—baseline, adverse, and severely adverse—include 28 variables that cover domestic and international economic activity. The Fed noted that “less-complex” firms with total consolidated assets between $100 billion and $250 billion have been moved to an extended stress test cycle for the 2019 cycle. (See related InfoBytes coverage here.) Capital plan and stress testing submissions are due by April 5.

    In addition, the Fed finalized enhanced disclosures of the stress testing models used in annual CCARs beginning in 2019, which will be updated each year. The Fed also amended its policy regarding the economic scenario design framework for stress testing, and adopted a policy statement on prior disclosures, which outlines the Fed’s approach to model development, implementation, and validation. The changes are designed to increase the transparency of the stress testing exercises and provide significantly more information for firms.

    In related news, also on February 5, the OCC released its own stress testing scenarios for OCC-supervised institutions.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Federal Reserve CCAR Stress Test OCC EGRRCPA Of Interest to Non-US Persons

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  • Federal Reserve Governor discusses CRA modernization feedback

    Federal Issues

    On February 1, Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard spoke at the “Research Symposium on the Community Reinvestment Act” hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia to discuss the need to update Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) regulations. Brainard summarized comment letters received in response to the OCC’s Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) published last August (previously covered by InfoBytes) seeking input on ways to transform or modernize the CRA regulatory framework, and discussed the following six key takeaways:

    • There is broad support for the CRA among commenters—including academics, financial institutions, banking trade associations, community organizations, consumer groups, and citizens—who, among other things, applaud the volume of CRA loans and investments that support low-and-moderate income households and communities.
    • There is general agreement among commenters for the need to modernize—but not completely overhaul—CRA assessment areas, while retaining its core focus.
    • Commenters support different performance tests for different types of banks. According to Brainard, there is broad agreement that “CRA regulations cannot be one-size-fits-all” and should be tailored to banks of different sizes, as well as different business models.
    • CRA modernization should keep the focus on underserved areas. Commenters discussed concerns about “CRA hotspots and credit deserts,” and the need for incentives to ensure CRA capital can reach underserved communities has been a common theme at regional roundtables.
    • Commenters offered recommendations on how to increase the “consistency and predictability of CRA evaluations and ratings.”
    • Roundtable discussions as well as commenters have emphasized the “historical context of the CRA as it relates to redlining practices,” and demonstrated strong support for the CRA to retain its underlying focus of reaching all underserved borrowers, including low-income communities and communities of color.

    Federal Issues Federal Reserve CRA OCC Redlining Fair Lending

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  • FDIC, Federal Reserve issue Voluntary Private Education Loan Rehabilitation Programs advisory

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On February 4, the FDIC and the Federal Reserve Board issued a joint advisory on Voluntary Private Education Loan Rehabilitation Programs to alert financial institutions of an amendment to section 623 of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) contained within section 602 of the Economic, Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act. The amendment provides a safe harbor from potential claims of inaccurate reporting under the FCRA, provided the financial institutions who choose to offer private education loan rehabilitation programs satisfy section 602’s statutory requirements before removing a reported default from a qualified borrower’s credit report.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance FDIC Federal Reserve Student Lending FCRA EGRRCPA

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  • Federal Reserve issues final rules reflecting credit and interest rate increases

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On January 31, the Federal Reserve Board (Fed) published a final rule amending Regulation A (Extensions of Credit by Federal Reserve Banks) to reflect its December 19 approval of a one-quarter percent increase, from 2.75 percent to 3 percent. Additionally, because the formula for the secondary credit rate incorporates the primary rate, the secondary credit rate also increased by one-quarter percentage point, from 3.25 percent to 3.5 percent. The rate changes took effect on January 31, but were applicable on December 20, 2018.

    The same day, the Fed also issued a final rule amending Regulation D (Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions) to reflect approval of a 0.20 percentage point increase to the “rate of interest paid on balances maintained to satisfy reserve balance requirements (“IORR”) and the rate of interest paid on excess balances (“IOER”), both now at 2.4 percent, maintained at Federal Reserve Banks by or on behalf of eligible institutions.” The rate changes took effect on January 31, but were applicable on December 20.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Federal Reserve Regulation A Regulation D Federal Register

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  • Final rule subject to approval will require federally regulated lending institutions to accept private flood insurance

    Federal Issues

    Recently, the FDIC and OCC approved a joint final rule governing the acceptance of private flood insurance policies. (The final rule must also be approved by—and is still under review with—the other agencies jointly issuing the rule: the Federal Reserve Board, Farm Credit Administration, and National Credit Union Association.) The final rule amends regulations governing loans secured by properties in special flood hazard areas to implement the provisions of the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012 (Biggert Waters) concerning private flood insurance (see previous InfoBytes coverage of the proposed rule here). The National Flood Insurance Act and the Flood Disaster Protection Act require flood insurance on improved property that secures a loan made, increased, extended, or renewed by a federally regulated lending institution (lending institution) if the property is in a special flood hazard area for which flood insurance is available under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Biggert Waters required the Agencies to adopt regulations directing lending institutions to accept insurance that meets the definition of “private flood insurance” in lieu of NFIP flood insurance.

    The final rule, once approved by all five regulators, will institute the following provisions to take effect July 1:

    • Lending institutions must accept private flood insurance policies meeting the definition of “private flood insurance.”
    • Lending institutions may rely on a “streamlined compliance aid provision” to determine, without further review, that a policy meet the definition of “private flood insurance” if the policy (or an endorsement to the policy) contains the following language: “This policy meets the definition of private flood insurance contained in 42 U.S.C. 4012a(b)(7) and the corresponding regulation.”
    • Lending institutions may choose to accept private policies that do not meet the statutory criteria for “private flood insurance” as long as the policies meet certain criteria and the lending institutions document that the policies offer “sufficient protection for a designated loan, consistent with general safety and soundness principles.”
    • Lending institutions may exercise discretion when accepting non-traditional flood coverage issued by “mutual aid societies,” subject to certain conditions including that the lending institutions’ primary federal supervisory agency has determined that the plans qualify as flood insurance. However, the final rule does not require lending institutions to accept coverage issued by mutual aid societies.

    Federal Issues Federal Reserve OCC FDIC NCUA Farm Credit Administration Flood Insurance National Flood Insurance Act Flood Disaster Protection Act National Flood Insurance Program

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  • OCC announces adoption of 18-month examination cycle final rule

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On January 17, the OCC announced, together with the Federal Reserve Board and the FDIC, the final rule amending regulations governing eligibility for the 18-month on-site examination cycle, pursuant to the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act. The final rule was published without change from the interim rule issued in August 2018 (covered by InfoBytes here). The final rule allows for qualifying insured depository institutions with less than $3 billion in total assets (which is an increase from the previous threshold of $1 billion) to be eligible for an 18-month on-site examination cycle. The agencies reserve the right to adopt a more frequent schedule than 18 months for qualifying institutions if deemed “necessary or appropriate.” The final rule is effective January 28.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Federal Reserve FDIC OCC EGRRCPA Examination

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  • Regulators encourage financial institutions to work with borrowers impacted by government shutdown; FHA also issues shutdown guidance

    Federal Issues

    On January 11, the Federal Reserve Board, CSBS, CFPB, FDIC, NCUA, and OCC (together, the “Agencies”) released a joint statement (see also FDIC FIL-1-2019) to encourage financial institutions to work with consumers impacted by the federal government shutdown. According to the Agencies, borrowers may face temporary hardships when making payments on mortgages, student loans, auto loans, business loans, or credit cards. FDIC FIL-1-2019 states that prudent workout arrangements, such as extending new credit, waiving fees, easing limits on credit cards, allowing deferred or skipped payments, modifying existing loan terms, and delaying delinquency notice submissions to credit bureaus, will not be subject to examiner criticism provided the efforts are “consistent with safe-and-sound lending practices.”

    Separately, on January 8, Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Commissioner Brian Montgomery issued a letter regarding the shutdown reminding FHA-approved lenders and mortgagees of their ongoing obligation to offer special forbearance to borrowers experiencing loss of income and to evaluate borrowers for available loss mitigation options to prevent foreclosures. In addition, FHA also encourages mortgagees and lenders to waive late fees and suspend credit reporting on affected borrowers.

    Federal Issues Federal Reserve OCC FDIC CSBS NCUA FHA Consumer Lending Mortgages Credit Report Shutdown Relief

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  • Federal Reserve issues enforcement action against Texas bank for BSA/AML compliance issues

    Financial Crimes

    On January 8, the Federal Reserve Board announced an enforcement action against a Texas bank for alleged weaknesses in its anti-money laundering risk management and compliance programs, including failure to comply with applicable rules and regulations, such as the Bank Secrecy Act. Under the terms of the order, the bank is required to (i) develop and implement a written plan to strengthen the board of directors’ oversight of Bank Secrecy Act/anti-money laundering (BSA/AML) compliance; (ii) submit an enhanced written compliance program that complies with BSA/AML requirements; (iii) ensure the bank provides effective training for all personnel related to BSA/AML compliance responsibilities; (iv) submit an enhanced, written customer due diligence plan; (v) submit a program to ensure compliant, timely, and accurate suspicious activity monitoring and reporting; (vi) retain an independent third party to ensure the effectiveness of the bank’s transaction monitoring system; and (vii) submit a written plan for independent testing of the bank’s compliance with all applicable BSA/AML requirements. A civil money penalty was not assessed against the bank.

    Financial Crimes Federal Reserve Anti-Money Laundering Bank Compliance Bank Secrecy Act Of Interest to Non-US Persons

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  • Federal Reserve issues proposal amending stress test requirements

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On January 8, the Federal Reserve Board (Board) issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR) that would revise company-run stress test and supervisory stress test requirements to conform with Section 401 of the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act (the Act). Similar to the previously issued NPRs by the FDIC and the OCC (covered by InfoBytes here), the proposed rule will, among other things, change the minimum threshold for applicability from $10 billion to $250 billion in consolidated assets and revise the frequency of required company-run stress tests for most state member banks from annual to biannual. However, the proposed rule notes that certain state member banks will still be required to conduct annual stress tests, such as (i) those that are subsidiaries of global systemically important bank holding companies; (ii) bank holding companies that have $700 billion or more in total assets; or (iii) cross-jurisdictional activity of $75 billion or more. Furthermore, the proposed rule will remove the “adverse” stress testing scenario—which the Board states has provided “limited incremental information”—and require stress tests to be conducted under the “baseline” and “severely adverse” stress testing scenarios. Comments on the NPR must be received by February 19.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Federal Reserve FDIC OCC EGRRCPA

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