Skip to main content
Menu Icon Menu Icon
Close

InfoBytes Blog

Financial Services Law Insights and Observations

Filter

Subscribe to our InfoBytes Blog weekly newsletter and other publications for news affecting the financial services industry.

  • FCC proposed rulemaking will expand caller ID spoofing enforcement

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On February 14, the FCC released a notice of proposed rulemaking intended to strengthen its rules against caller ID spoofing and expand the agency’s enforcement efforts against illegal spoofed text messages and phone calls, including those from overseas. The proposed rules would enact requirements in the recently passed RAY BAUM’S Act of 2018, and expand Truth in Caller ID Act prohibitions against the transmittal of “misleading or inaccurate caller ID information (‘spoofing’) with the intent to defraud, cause harm, or wrongfully obtain anything of value” to text messages and calls to U.S. residents originating from outside the U.S.

    The FCC seeks comments on the proposed rules—adopted unanimously at the agency’s February 14 meeting—on, among other things, what changes to the Truth in Caller ID rules can be made “to better prevent inaccurate or misleading caller ID information from harming consumers.” Comments will be due 60 days after publication in the Federal Register.

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security FCC Robocalls Enforcement Truth in Caller ID Act

    Share page with AddThis
  • Senate Banking Committee seeks feedback on data privacy, protection, and collection

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On February 13, Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Chairman Mike Crapo (R-ID) and Ranking Member Sherrod Brown (D-OH) invited stakeholder feedback on “the collection, use and protection of sensitive information from financial regulators and private companies” as a means of informing potential future legislation. In a press release issued by the committee, Crapo noted, “Given the exponential growth and use of data, and corresponding data breaches, it is worth examining how the Fair Credit Reporting Act should work in a digital economy, and whether certain data brokers and other firms serve a function similar to the original consumer reporting agencies.” He further stressed the importance of understanding how consumer data is compiled and protected, and how consumers are able to access and correct sensitive information. The release sought answers to five questions designed to help examine ways in which legislation, regulation, or the implementation of best practices can (i) provide consumers better control over their financial data, as well as timely data breach notifications; (ii) ensure consumers receive disclosures concerning both the type of information being collected and its purpose for collection; (iii) provide consumers control over how their data is being used—including the sharing of information by third-parties; (iv) protect consumer data and ensure the accuracy of reported information in a consumer’s credit file; and (v) allow consumers the ability to “easily identify and exercise control of data that is being . . . collected and shared” as a determining factor when establishing whether a consumer is eligible for, among other things, credit or employment.

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Senate Banking Committee Federal Legislation Consumer Protection Fair Credit Reporting Act

    Share page with AddThis
  • NYDFS’ cybersecurity FAQs provide process for covered entities that no longer qualify for exemptions

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On February 2, NYDFS updated its answers to FAQs regarding 23 NYCRR Part 500, which established cybersecurity requirements for banks, insurance companies, and other financial services institutions. (See here for previous InfoBytes coverage on updates to the FAQs.) Among other things, the update outlines the procedures covered entities must follow if the entity ceases to qualify for exemptions under Section 500.19. Covered entities who no longer qualify for an exemption will have 180 days from the end of their most recent fiscal year to comply with all applicable requirements of 23 NYCRR Part 500. NYDFS further notes that covered entities may be required to periodically refile their exemptions to ensure qualification.

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security NYDFS 23 NYCRR Part 500 State Issues Compliance

    Share page with AddThis
  • Final deadline approaching for NYDFS cybersecurity regulation

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On January 31, NYDFS issued a reminder for regulated entities that the final deadline for implementing NYDFS’s cybersecurity regulation ends March 1. Under the new regulation, banks, insurance companies, mortgage companies, money transmitters, licensed lenders and other financial services institutions regulated by NYDFS are required to implement a cybersecurity program to protect consumer data. The last step in the implementation timeline requires covered entities that use third-party providers to put in place policies and procedures ensuring the security of information systems and nonpublic information accessible to, or held by, such third parties. NYDFS also reminded regulated entities that the deadline to file their second certification of compliance via NYDFS’ cybersecurity portal is February 15.

    Previously InfoBytes coverage on NYDFS’ cybersecurity regulation are available here.

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security NYDFS 23 NYCRR Part 500 State Issues Third-Party

    Share page with AddThis
  • FTC commissioners discuss need for expanded authority over consumer data privacy and security

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On November 27, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation’s Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, Insurance, and Data Security conducted a hearing to discuss, among other topics, whether the FTC should be granted expanded authority over consumer data privacy and security. The hearing entitled “Oversight of the Federal Trade Commission” heard from the Chairman of the FTC as well as the agency’s four commissioners. Ranking Member Senator Bill Nelson’s opening statement discussed the need for providing additional resources to the FTC in order to ensure the agency is able to perform its mandated duties and effectively protect U.S. consumers from unfair or deceptive acts or practices. The five witnesses agreed that enforcement remains a priority for the FTC and called for comprehensive consumer privacy legislation that would clarify the agency’s authority and the rules relating to data security and breach notification, while fostering competition and innovation to the benefit of consumers. Specifically, FTC Chairman Joseph Simons stated he would support federal data security legislation if it provided the following three items: (i) the ability to seek civil money penalties to effectively deter unlawful conduct; (ii) jurisdiction over nonprofits and common carriers; and (iii) broad rulemaking authority to issue implementing rules under the Administrative Procedures Act for consumer protection issues such as privacy and data security. Commissioner Rohit Chopra also emphasized the need for Congress to support the FTC’s authority under Section 13B of the FTC Act, which authorizes the FTC to seek preliminary and permanent injunctions against companies and individuals.

    However, Senator Blumenthal argued that too often the FTC has “fallen short” on protecting consumer privacy, particularly in terms of enforcement and pressing challenges. According to Senator Blumenthal, big tech companies misuse their power and consent orders are not “vigorously and adequately enforced.” He argued that the FTC must have the tools and resources to establish meaningful penalties for first offenses that pose a credible deterrent and recognize state attorneys general to ensure violations are investigated and punished.

    Among other things, the hearing also discussed topics addressing: (i) the FTC’s ongoing series of public hearings reexamining the agency’s approach to consumer privacy in light of changing technologies (see previous InfoBytes coverage here); (ii) federal preemption versus state-by-state laws and the risk of inconsistencies and compliance challenges; (iii) the potential use of the FTC’s Section 6B authority, which would allow requests to be sent to the tech industry to understand what data is collected from consumers and how that information is used, shared, and sold; (iv) privacy protections for children, including the strengths and weaknesses of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, particularly with respect to children ages 13 and older; (v) data minimization controls; and (vi) notice and comment rulemaking authority.

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security FTC U.S. Senate Enforcement

    Share page with AddThis
  • FTC emphasizes need for privacy and data security legislation

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On November 13, the FTC submitted comments in response to the Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) request for input on developing the Administration’s approach to consumer data privacy protections. In its comment letter, the FTC noted that it supported a balanced approach to privacy, weighing the risks of data misuse with the benefits of data to innovation and competition, and reiterated its support for data privacy legislation. Specifically, the FTC renewed its call for Congressional action that clarifies the FTC’s authority and the rules relating to data security and breach notification. According to the FTC, any such legislation should balance “consumers’ legitimate concerns about the protections afforded to the collection, use, and sharing of their data with business’ need for clear rules of the road, consumers’ demand for data-driven products and services, and the importance of flexible frameworks that foster innovation.”

    The FTC emphasized it is “uniquely situated” to balance consumers’ interest in privacy, innovation, and competition and argued it should continue to be the primary enforcer of the laws related to “information flows in the marketplace,” whether it’s under the existing or new privacy framework. The FTC noted, however, that the existing framework places a number of limitations on its powers, including (i) its lack of authority over non-profits and common carriers; (ii) its inability to levy civil money penalties; and (iii) its lack of broad rulemaking authority under the APA for consumer protection issues such as privacy and data security.   

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security FTC Federal Legislation FTC Act

    Share page with AddThis
  • FTC to hold public hearings on consumer privacy and data security; focus will address data security enforcement program

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On October 26, the FTC announced it will hold four days of public hearings in December 2018 and February 2019 to examine the Commission’s authority to deter unfair and deceptive conduct in data security and privacy matters as part of its broader series of hearings on “Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century.” According to the FTC, these hearings (i) “will provide the first comprehensive re-examination of the FTC’s approach to consumer privacy since 2012,” and (ii) “will provide an opportunity to reexamine the Commission’s work in light of changing technologies, legal regimes, and business models.”

    The FTC will continue to accept public comments through March 13, 2019, regarding items to be discussed at the February 2019 hearing. As previously covered by InfoBytes, a coalition of bipartisan state Attorneys General submitted a comment letter to the FTC last August requesting that they be included in the discussions regarding consumer protection during the Commission’s hearing process. Specifically, the letter emphasized the states’ “long history of protecting consumers from unfair and deceptive practices” under each state’s consumer protection authority, and noted consumers’ concerns over personal information and data security.

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security FTC Consumer Protection State Attorney General

    Share page with AddThis
  • NYDFS updates cybersecurity FAQs to address use of utilization review agents

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On October 25, NYDFS provided a new update to its answers to FAQs relating to 23 NYCRR Part 500, which took effect March 1, 2017, and establishes cybersecurity requirements for banks, insurance companies, and other financial services institutions. The original promulgation of the FAQs was covered in Infobytes, as were the last updates in February, March, and August.

    The new update states that when a covered entity uses an independent “Utilization Review” agent (UR agent) who receives nonpublic information, the covered entity should treat the UR agent as a third-party service provider in order to properly assess and address any potential risks to their data and systems. NYDFS emphasizes that covered entities bear the responsibility for these protections.

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security NYDFS 23 NYCRR Part 500 State Issues

    Share page with AddThis
  • FTC approves final expanded settlement with global ride-sharing company over data breaches

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On October 26, the FTC announced its final approval of an expanded settlement with a global ride-sharing company over allegations that the company violated the FTC Act by deceiving consumers regarding the company’s privacy and data practices. Specifically, the company allegedly failed to closely monitor and audit its employees’ internal access to consumer and driver data. Furthermore, the company represented to consumers and drivers that personal information stored in its databases were secure, but, according to the FTC, the company failed to implement reasonable measures to prevent unauthorized access to consumers and driver data maintained by the ride-sharing company’s third-party cloud service provider. In April, the FTC announced it would be expanding the original settlement from August 2017 (previously covered by InfoBytes here), which covered a 2014 data breach, because it was discovered the company failed to disclose a subsequent data breach that occurred in 2016 for more than a year, despite the on-going FTC investigation of the 2014 data breach.

    The expanded final settlement subjects the company to civil penalties if it fails to notify the FTC of future incidents involving unauthorized access to data. The settlement also, among other things, requires the company to implement a comprehensive privacy program, including biennial third-party privacy assessments for 20 years.

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security FTC Settlement Data Breach FTC Act Third-Party

    Share page with AddThis
  • Consumer advocates testify before Senate Commerce Committee on need for federal consumer data privacy legislation

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On October 10, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation held the second in a series of hearings on the subject of consumer data privacy safeguards. The hearing entitled “Consumer Data Privacy: Examining Lessons From the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation and the California Consumer Privacy Act” heard from consumer privacy advocates on lessons from the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) of 2018, and what types of consumer protections should be considered in future federal legislation. Committee Chairman, Senator John Thune, opened the hearing by emphasizing the importance of promoting privacy without stifling innovation. Senator Thune stated that, while understanding the experience of technology and telecommunications companies in this space is important, any new federal privacy law must also incorporate views from affected industry stakeholders and consumer advocates.

    The consumer privacy advocate witnesses agreed there is a need for heightened consumer protections and rights, and that the time is ripe to have a debate on what a consumer data privacy law at the federal level would look like and how it would work with state level laws. However, witnesses cautioned that federal legislation should create a floor and not a ceiling for privacy that will not prevent states from passing their own privacy laws. One of the witnesses who led the effort behind the California ballot initiative that resulted in the CCPA emphasized that federal legislation should contain a robust enforcement mechanism, while a witness from the Center for Democracy & Technology said that (i) lawmakers should give the FTC the ability to fine companies that violate consumers’ privacy and provide the agency with more resources; and (ii) a federal law should cover entities of all sizes and clarify what secondary and third-party uses of data are permissible.

    Among other things, the hearing also discussed topics addressing: (i) GDPR open investigations; (ii) support for state Attorney General enforcement rights; (iii) privacy protections for children, including the strengths and weaknesses of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, particularly with respect to children ages 13 and older; and (iv) consumers’ rights to control their personal data.

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Data Breach U.S. Senate GDPR State Attorney General State Legislation Enforcement

    Share page with AddThis

Pages

Upcoming Events