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  • OCC issues Comptroller’s Handbook booklet updating interest rate risk

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On March 26, the OCC issued Bulletin 2020-26 announcing the revision of the Interest Rate Risk booklet of the Comptroller’s Handbook, which replaces the June 1997 version of the same name. The revised booklet “incorporates and reflects applicable statutes and regulations, guidance, and examination procedures,” and expands model risk and model risk management discussions, “including developing, reviewing, and stress testing model assumptions.” The revised booklet also provides guidelines “consistent with the Pillar 2 supervisory approach outlined in the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision’s Interest Rate Risk in the Banking Book.”

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance OCC Comptroller's Handbook Interest Rate Basel Risk Management

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  • CFPB taskforce seeks input on consumer financial protection law improvements

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On March 27, the CFPB’s Taskforce on Federal Consumer Financial Law issued a request for information (RFI) seeking input on consumer protection areas for the taskforce to focus its research and analysis, and requesting suggestions for “harmonizing, modernizing, and updating the federal consumer financial laws.” Specifically, the taskforce seeks information on “fair, transparent, and competitive” consumer financial service areas that are currently functioning well, as well as areas that may benefit from regulatory improvements to “facilitate competition and materially increase consumer welfare.” Areas of interest include: (i) automobile financing; (ii) consumer credit and reporting; (iii) debt collection and settlements; (iv) deposit accounts, electronic payments, money transfers, and prepaid cards; (v) mortgage origination and servicing; (vi) small-dollar lending; and (vii) student lending and servicing. Responses are due 60 days after the RFI is published in the Federal Register.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance CFPB Consumer Protection Consumer Finance

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  • FHFA final rule amends stress testing requirements

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On March 24, the FHFA published a final rule amending its stress testing requirements consistent with changes made by section 401 of the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act. The final rule adopts amendments proposed last December (covered by InfoBytes here) without change, increasing the minimum threshold for FHFA-regulated entities to conduct stress tests from $10 billion to $250 billion in total consolidated assets, removing the requirements for Federal Home Loan Banks to conduct stress tests, and reducing the number of stress test scenarios from three to two by removing the “adverse” scenario. The final rule took effect March 24.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance FHFA Stress Test EGRRCPA FHLB

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  • CFPB issues guidance to student loan borrowers on Covid-19 debt relief

    Federal Issues

    On March 27, the CFPB issued guidance on the student loan provisions of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Pursuant to the Act, borrowers with federally held student loans will automatically have their loan principal and interest payments paused until September 30. Borrowers do not need to take any action to have their payments suspended and interest will not accrue during this period. The CFPB also provided additional guidance on the impact on privately held student loans and federal loans held by commercial lenders, and provided information to help borrowers avoid student loan debt relief scams.

    Federal Issues Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Student Lending Debt Relief Consumer Finance Covid-19 CFPB CARES Act Federal Legislation

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  • FDIC requests 2019 diversity self-assessments through new automated portal

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On March 23, the FDIC issued FIL-23-2020 to announce a request from the agency’s Office of Minority and Women Inclusion for 2019 diversity self-assessments from FDIC-regulated financial institutions in accordance with Section 342 of the Dodd-Frank Act. Financial institutions with 100 or more employees should refer to the FIL for instructions on completing the voluntary self-assessment. The FDIC strongly encourages financial institutions to use the new automated portal: Diversity Self-Assessment of FDIC Regulated Financial Institutions when completing self-assessments, as it allows for multiple authorized users and the ability to view previous submissions, as well as provides additional resources for participants. Self-assessments are due May 31.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance FDIC Federal Issues Diversity Dodd-Frank Financial Institutions

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  • FDIC updates guidance on protecting banks and consumers

    Federal Issues

    On March 27, the FDIC announced an update to guidance it issued on March 16 regarding “steps to protect banks and consumers and to continue operations.” Among the updates, the agency (i) extended telework for all FDIC employees from March 30 until at least April 12; (ii) expanded the period of time the agency will conduct “[s]upervisory and other FDIC activities” off-site through April 12; and (iii) encouraged institutions to communicate with their “Examiner-in-Charge or Regional Director” if they anticipate delays in responding to “normal supervisory requests.”

    Federal Issues FDIC Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Supervision Examination Covid-19

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  • FDIC, OCC, NCUA identify essential critical infrastructure workers during Covid-19

    Federal Issues

    On March 26, the FDIC issued FIL-25-2020 stating that the financial services sector is a “critical infrastructure” during the Covid-19 pandemic pursuant to the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency’s (CISA) March 19 guidance. The guidance is intended to help state, local, and industry partners identify critical infrastructure sectors and essential workers in order to ensure continuity of critical functions. The FIL advises company leadership to provide workers with documentation identifying them as critical infrastructure workers who need “to travel inside restricted areas in order to support critical infrastructure.”

    On March 25, the OCC issued similar guidance pursuant to CISA’s guidance. Bulletin 2020-23 encourages essential critical infrastructure workers to maintain normal work schedules during the Covid-19 pandemic, and offers guidance for banks concerning workers who may need to move within and between restricted areas. Essential critical infrastructure workers include those who are needed to: (i) “process and maintain systems for processing financial transactions and services (e.g., payment, clearing and settlement; wholesale funding; insurance services; and capital markets activities)”; (ii) “provide consumer access to banking and lending services,” such as ATMs and armored cash carriers; and (iii) support financial institutions (e.g., staffing data and security operations centers). The workers also include key third party providers who deliver core services. The OCC advises banks to, among other things, update business continuity plans and provide documentation to workers detailing work-related travel.

    The NCUA also sent a letter to member boards of directors, chief executive officers, chief information officers, and chief information security officers identifying essential critical infrastructure workers pursuant to CISA’s guidance. Updates to Covid-19 NCUA resources are available here.

    Federal Issues Agency Rule-Making & Guidance FDIC OCC NCUA Covid-19 Department of Homeland Security

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  • Banking regulators urge small-dollar lending during Covid-19 crisis

    Federal Issues

    On March 26, the FDIC, Federal Reserve Board, CFPB, NCUA, and OCC issued a joint statement encouraging banks, savings associations, and credit unions to offer responsible, small-dollar loans to consumers and small businesses affected by Covid-19. The agencies recognize that small-dollar lending can play an important role in meeting credit needs during this time period, and recommend that financial institutions offer loans “through a variety of structures including open-end lines of credit, closed-end installment loans, or appropriately structured single payment loans.” For borrowers experiencing unexpected circumstances who cannot repay a loan as structured, financial institutions are “further encouraged to consider workout strategies designed to help borrowers to repay the principal of the loan while mitigating the need to re-borrow.” All loans, however, should be offered in a manner “consistent with safe and sound practices” that “provides fair treatment of consumers, and complies with applicable statutes and regulations, including consumer protection laws.”

    Federal Issues Agency Rule-Making & Guidance FDIC Federal Reserve CFPB OCC NCUA Small Dollar Lending Small Business Lending Covid-19

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  • CFPB outlines regulatory flexibility related to Covid-19

    Federal Issues

    On March 26, the CFPB announced several regulatory flexibility measures to help financial companies work with consumers affected by Covid-19. Specifically, the measures postpone certain industry data collections on Bureau-related rules. These include:

    • HMDA. Quarterly information reporting by certain mortgage lenders as required under HMDA and Regulation C will not be expected during this time. However, entities should continue collecting and recording HMDA data in anticipation of making annual submissions. Entities will be provided information by the Bureau on when and how to commence new quarterly HMDA data submissions. (See statement here.)
    • TILA. During this time, annual submissions required under TILA, Regulation Z, and Regulation E “concerning agreements between credit card issuers and institutions of higher education; quarterly submission of consumer credit card agreements; collection of certain credit card price and availability information; and submission of prepaid account agreements and related information” will not be expected. (See statement here.)
    • Section 1071. A survey seeking information from financial institutions on the cost of compliance in connection with pending rulemaking on Section 1071 of the Dodd-Frank Act has been postponed. As previously covered by InfoBytes, under the terms of a stipulated settlement resolving a 2019 lawsuit that sought an order compelling the Bureau to issue a final rule implementing Section 1071, the Bureau agreed to outline a proposal for collecting data and studying discrimination in small-business lending.
    • PACE Financing. A survey of firms providing Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing to consumers for the purposes of implementing Section 307 of the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act has been postponed.
    • Supervision and Enforcement. The Bureau’s policy statement provides “that it does not intend to cite in an examination or initiate an enforcement action against any entity for failure to submit to the Bureau” specified information related to credit card and prepaid accounts. However, the Bureau’s announcement advises entities to “maintain records sufficient to allow them to make delayed submissions pursuant to Bureau guidance.” With respect to operational challenges facing institutions due to Covid-19, the Bureau states that it will work with institutions when scheduling examinations and other supervisory activities to minimize disruption and burden. “[W]hen conducting examinations and other supervisory activities and in determining whether to take enforcement action, the Bureau will consider the circumstances that entities may face as a result of the [Covid-19] pandemic and will be sensitive to good-faith efforts demonstrably designed to assist consumers,” the announcement states.

    Federal Issues CFPB Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Data Collection / Aggregation Mortgages Data HMDA Credit Cards Prepaid Cards TILA Dodd-Frank PACE Programs Examination Supervision Consumer Finance Covid-19

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  • SEC broadens and extends relief for businesses affected by Covid-19

    Federal Issues

    On March 25, the SEC announced that publicly traded companies have an additional 45 days, subject to certain conditions, to file annual and quarterly reports in an effort to help businesses whose operations may be affected by Covid-19. Disclosure reports due between March 1 and July 1 will be eligible for extensions if companies can justify the need, the SEC stated in the announcement, which supersedes and extends a previously issued order on March 4. To qualify for an extension, “companies must continue to convey through a current report a summary of why the relief is needed in their particular circumstances for each periodic report that is delayed.” In addition, the SEC issued orders (see here and here) that will give certain investment funds and investment advisors more time to meet filing and delivery requirements and more flexibility to avoid in-person meetings. These orders broaden and extend relief that the SEC announced earlier this month (covered by InfoBytes here). The announcement also provides public company disclosure guidance as well as additional information with respect to certain obligations under various securities laws.

     

    Federal Issues SEC Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Compliance Covid-19 Securities

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