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  • OFAC sanctions Iranian petroleum shipping network

    Financial Crimes

    On September 4, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13224 against a complex shipping network “that is directed by and financially supports the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force (IRGC-QF) and its terrorist proxy Hizballah.” According to OFAC, the IRGC-QF managed to obfuscate its involvement in moving hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of Iranian oil over the past year through the use of the sanctioned shipping network for the benefit of illicit actors. The sanctioned shipping network includes 16 entities and 10 individuals, as well as 11 vessels identified as “as property in which blocked persons have an interest.”

    As a result of the sanctions, “all property and interests in property of these entities that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC noted that its regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated persons, and warned foreign financial institutions that if they knowingly facilitate significant financial transactions for any of the designated entities, they may be subject to U.S. correspondent account or payable-through account sanctions. Additionally, OFAC issued a reminder that “the purchase, acquisition, sale, transport, or marketing of petroleum or petroleum products from Iran is sanctionable pursuant to E.O. 13846,” and released a new shipping advisory warning the maritime community of these types of schemes and the sanctions risks associated with blocked persons.

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Of Interest to Non-US Persons Iran Sanctions

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  • OFAC sanctions bank connected to Hizballah; identifies several individuals as facilitators for HAMAS

    Financial Crimes

    On August 29, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order 13224 (E.O. 13224) against a Lebanon-based financial institution, along with three of its subsidiaries, for allegedly facilitating banking activities for Hizballah. OFAC designated the financial institution as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist “for assisting in, sponsoring, or providing financial, material, or technological support for, or financial or other services to or in support of, Hizballah.” As a result of the sanctions, “all property and interests in property of these targets that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC noted that its regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated persons. The designated entities are also subject to secondary sanctions pursuant to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations, which implement the Hizballah International Financing Prevention Act of 2015, and allow OFAC the authority to “prohibit or impose strict conditions on the opening or maintaining in the United States of a correspondent account or a payable-through account by a foreign financial institution that knowingly facilitates a significant transaction for Hizballah, or a person acting on behalf of or at the direction of, or owned or controlled by, Hizballah.”

    The same day, OFAC also designated several financial facilitators pursuant to E.O. 13224 for allegedly acting as intermediaries between Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force and HAMAS’s operational arm. According to OFAC, the Lebanon and Gaza-based financial facilitators are responsible for moving tens of millions of dollars from Iran through Hizballah to HAMAS, funding violence against people in Gaza. As a result, all property and interests in property of the sanctioned targets subject to U.S. jurisdiction are blocked and must be reported to OFAC. U.S. persons are also generally prohibited from entering into transactions with designated persons. Furthermore, “persons that engage in certain transactions with the individuals designated today may themselves be exposed to sanctions or subject to an enforcement action.” 

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Sanctions Of Interest to Non-US Persons Iran

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  • OFAC sanctions procurement networks supporting Iran’s missile programs

    Financial Crimes

    On August 28, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13382, designated two Iranian networks involved in the procurement of materials for persons related to the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, the Iranian regime’s missile program, and Iran’s Ministry of Defense and Armed Forces Logistics. According to OFAC, one of the identified networks utilized a Hong Kong-front company to evade U.S. and international sanctions in order to “facilitate tens of millions of dollars’ worth of proliferation activities targeting U.S. technology and electronic components.” As a result of the sanctions, “all property and interests in property of these individuals that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC noted that its regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated individuals, and warned foreign financial institutions that if they knowingly facilitate significant transactions for any of the designated individuals, they may be subject to U.S. correspondent account or payable-through account sanctions.

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury Sanctions Of Interest to Non-US Persons OFAC Iran

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  • OFAC amends sanctions regulations targeting Iran’s metal sector

    Financial Crimes

    On August 6, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced that the “Iranian Human Rights Sanctions Regulations” has been renamed as the “Iranian Sector and Human Rights Abuses Sanctions Regulations.” The amended sanctions regulations implement Executive Order (E.O.) 13871 (previously covered by InfoBytes here), which authorizes the imposition of sanctions on persons determined to operate in Iran’s iron, steel, aluminum, and copper sectors. OFAC concurrently amended and published several new FAQs, including a discussion of the relevant 90-day wind-down period for affected transactions as well as sanction exceptions. The amendments take effect August 7.

    Visit here for additional InfoBytes coverage of actions related to Iran.

    Financial Crimes OFAC Department of Treasury Sanctions Of Interest to Non-US Persons Iran

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  • OFAC fines truck manufacturer for Iranian sanctions violations

    Financial Crimes

    On August 6, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced a roughly $1.7 million settlement with a Washington-based truck manufacturer for 63 alleged violations of the Iranian Transactions and Sanctions Regulations. The settlement resolves potential civil liability for actions taken by a wholly-owned subsidiary of the company that allegedly sold or supplied trucks with a total transactional value of over $5.4 million to European customers, but knew or had reason to know the trucks were ultimately intended for buyers in Iran.

    In arriving at the settlement amount, OFAC considered various mitigating factors, including that (i) neither the company nor the subsidiary have received a penalty or finding of a violation in the five years prior to the transactions at issue; (ii) the subsidiary had in place at the time of the alleged violations a trade sanctions compliance program with contractual prohibitions on dealers and service partners that were re-selling products in violation of U.S. trade sanctions; and (iii) the company and subsidiary voluntarily self-disclosed the issue to OFAC, cooperated with OFAC during the investigation, and undertook remedial efforts to minimize the risk of similar violations from occurring in the future.

    OFAC also considered various aggravating factors, including that the subsidiary failed to exercise caution when alerted to warning signs regarding the potential sales, and that in each instance, a subsidiary employee was aware of the conduct leading to the alleged violations.

    Visit here for additional InfoBytes coverage of actions related to Iran.

    Financial Crimes OFAC Department of Treasury Sanctions Of Interest to Non-US Persons Settlement Iran

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  • OFAC sanctions Iran’s foreign minister

    Financial Crimes

    On July 31, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13876, designated Iran’s foreign minister for allegedly acting on behalf of, directly or indirectly, the Supreme Leader of the Islamic Republic of Iran. As previously covered by InfoBytes, in June, the President issued E.O. 13876, which, among other things, authorizes the Secretaries of the Treasury and State Departments to impose sanctions on a foreign financial institution if it is determined the institution has knowingly conducted or facilitated any significant financial transactions for or on behalf of a blocked person. OFAC noted that additional information also indicated the Iranian foreign minister had coordinated with the IRGC-Qods Force, which is designated pursuant to terrorism and human rights authorities. 

    As a result of the sanctions designation, “all property and interests in property of these targets that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC noted that persons who engage in transactions with designated individuals and entities may expose themselves to sanctions or be subject to enforcement action.

    Financial Crimes Of Interest to Non-US Persons OFAC Iran Sanctions Executive Order

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  • OFAC sanctions international network involved in procuring materials for Iranian nuclear program

    Financial Crimes

    On July 18, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order 13382 against an international network of seven entities and five individuals involved in the procurement of sensitive materials for sanctioned elements of Iran’s nuclear program. According to OFAC, the network—based in Iran, China, and Belgium—acted as a procurement network in order to acquire materials controlled by the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), which were then used in facilities belonging to the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran. OFAC noted that while United Nations Security Council Resolution 2231 does permit certain NSG-controlled items to go to Iran, participants are required to receive advance, case-by-case approval, which the identified entities and individuals in this action did not receive. As a result of the sanctions, “all property and interests in property of these persons that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC notes that its regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated entities and individuals. Moreover, OFAC warned foreign financial institutions that if they knowingly facilitate significant transactions for any of the designated entities and individuals, they may be subject to U.S. correspondent account or payable-through account sanctions which, if imposed, could restrict their access to the U.S. financial system.

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Sanctions Iran Of Interest to Non-US Persons

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  • OFAC sanctions Iranian-backed Hizballah officials

    Financial Crimes

    On July 9, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order 13224 against three Iranian-backed Hizballah political and security figures for “exploit[ing] Lebanon’s financial and security elements” in furtherance of Hizballah’s and Iran’s activities in support of terrorists and acts of terrorism. As a result of the sanctions, “all property and interests in property of these targets that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC notes that its regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated individuals. The designated individuals are also subject to secondary sanctions pursuant to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations, which implement the Hizballah International Financing Prevention Act of 2015, and allow OFAC the authority to “prohibit or impose strict conditions on the opening or maintaining in the United States of a correspondent account or a payable-through account by a foreign financial institution that knowingly facilitates a significant transaction for Hizballah, or a person acting on behalf of or at the direction of, or owned or controlled by, Hizballah.”

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Sanctions Iran Of Interest to Non-US Persons

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  • President Trump imposes new sanctions on Iran; OFAC announces designations

    Financial Crimes

    On June 24, President Trump issued Executive Order (E.O.) 13876, “Imposing Sanctions with Respect to Iran,” which: (i) imposes sanctions on Iran’s Supreme Leader’s Office (SLO); and (ii) targets persons appointed to certain official or other positions by the Supreme Leader and/or his office for allegedly taking actions to “destabilize the Middle East, promote international terrorism, and advance Iran’s ballistic missile program, and Iran’s irresponsible and provocative actions in and over international waters.” Among other things, E.O. 13876 authorizes the Secretaries of Treasury and State to impose sanctions on a foreign financial institution if it is determined that it has knowingly conducted or facilitated any significant financial transactions in these sectors, or for or on behalf of a blocked person. These sanctions would prohibit the opening of, or impose strict conditions on maintaining, a correspondent account or payable-through account by such foreign financial institutions in the United States.

    On the same day, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) designated eight senior commanders of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) pursuant to E.O. 13224, which “provides a means by which to disrupt the financial support network for terrorists and terrorist organizations.” According to OFAC, the sanctions are meant to reinforce the President’s newly issued E.O. 13876. As a result of the designations, “all property and interests in property of these targets that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC noted that persons who engage in transactions with the designated individuals and entities may be exposed to sanctions themselves or subject to enforcement action.

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury Of Interest to Non-US Persons OFAC Executive Order Sanctions Iran

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  • OFAC sanctions Iran’s largest petrochemical holding group for funding IRGC

    Financial Crimes

    On June 7, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions against Iran’s largest petrochemical holding group for providing financial support to the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), an entity targeted for sanctions under OFAC’s Iran-related sanctions. In addition, OFAC designated the holding group’s network of 39 subsidiary petrochemical companies and foreign-based sales agents. According to OFAC, profits derived from the holding group’s activities “support the IRGC’s full range of nefarious activities, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction . . . and their means of delivery, support for terrorism, and a variety of human rights abuses, at home and abroad.”

    As a result, all property and interests in property belonging to the identified entities subject to U.S. jurisdiction are blocked and must be reported to OFAC, and U.S. persons are generally prohibited from transacting with them. Moreover, OFAC warned foreign financial institutions that they may be subject to U.S. correspondent account or payable-through account sanctions—which, if imposed, could restrict their access to the U.S. financial system—if they knowingly facilitate significant transactions for any of the designated entities. OFAC further issued a reminder that as of November 5, 2018, purchasing, acquiring, selling, transporting, or marketing petrochemical products from Iran is sanctionable under OFAC’s sanctions against Iran (covered by InfoBytes here).

    Visit here for additional InfoBytes coverage of actions related to Iran.

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Sanctions Iran Of Interest to Non-US Persons

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