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  • FCC warns telecoms to stop carrying “mortgage scam” robocalls

    Federal Issues

    On January 24, the FCC’s Enforcement Bureau announced it had ordered telecommunications companies to effectively mitigate robocall traffic originating from a Florida-based real estate brokerage firm selling mortgage scams. The FCC also sent a cease-and-desist letter to a voice service provider carrying the allegedly illegal robocall traffic. According to the FCC, several state attorneys general filed lawsuits late last year against the firm for allegedly using “misleading robocalls to ‘swindle’ and ‘scam’ residents into mortgaging their homes in exchange for small cash payments.” (See state AG press releases here, here, and here.) Additionally, last month, Senate Banking Committee Chairman Sherrod Brown (D-OH), along with Senators Tina Smith (D-MN) and Ron Wyden (D-OR) sent a letter to the FTC and the CFPB requesting a review of the firm’s use of exclusive 40-year listing agreements marketed as a “loan alternative.” (Covered by InfoBytes here.) In shutting down the robocalls, FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel stressed that sending junk calls to financially-stressed homeowners in order to offer “deceptive products and services is unconscionable.” Enforcement Bureau Chief Loyaan A. Egal added that the voice service provider should have been applying “Know Your Customer” principles before allowing the traffic on its networks.

    Federal Issues FCC Robocalls Consumer Finance Mortgages Consumer Protection Enforcement State Issues State Attorney General Listing Agreement

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  • CFPB says servicers should suggest sales over foreclosures for some borrowers

    Federal Issues

    On January 20, the CFPB encouraged mortgage servicers to advise homeowners struggling to pay their mortgages that a traditional sale may be better than foreclosure. The Bureau reported that due to the Covid-19 pandemic many homeowners are facing foreclosure, especially consumers who were delinquent when the pandemic began. The Bureau pointed out that while foreclosure rates are relatively low compared to pre-pandemic levels, mortgage data from November 2022 shows an increase of 23,400 foreclosure starts. “Often, the mortgage servicer’s phone representatives are the first line of communication with homeowners,” the Bureau said, reminding servicers to provide training to their representatives so they are prepared to provide information to equity-positive homeowners about selling their home as a potential option. “Of course, conversations about selling the home cannot substitute for the Regulation X requirement that mortgage servicers present all available loss mitigation alternatives to borrowers,” the Bureau stated, explaining that Appendix MS-4(B) to Regulation X contains sample language that can be used to inform homeowners of the option to sell their home. Additionally, the Bureau advised servicers to refer homeowners to HUD-approved housing counseling agencies to discuss their options.

    Federal Issues CFPB Consumer Finance Mortgages Servicing Mortgages Foreclosure Covid-19 Regulation X

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  • CFPB updates Mortgage Servicing Examination Procedures

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On January 18, the CFPB released an updated version of its Mortgage Servicing Examination Procedures, detailing the types of information examiners should gather when assessing whether servicers are complying with applicable laws and identifying consumer risks. The examination procedures, which were last updated in June 2016, cover forbearances and other tools, including streamlined loss mitigation options that mortgage servicers have used for consumers impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic. The Bureau noted in its announcement that “as long as these streamlined loss mitigation options are made available to borrowers experiencing hardship due to the COVID-19 national emergency, those same streamlined options can also be made available under the temporary flexibilities in the [agency’s pandemic-related mortgage servicing rules] to borrowers not experiencing COVID-19-related hardships.” Servicers are expected to continue to use all the tools at their disposal, including, when available, streamlined deferrals and modifications that meet the conditions of these pandemic-related mortgage servicing rules as they attempt to keep consumers in their homes. The Bureau said the updated examination procedures also incorporate focus areas from the agency’s Supervisory Highlights findings related to, among other things, (i) fees such as phone pay fees that servicers charge borrowers; and (ii) servicer misrepresentations concerning foreclosure options. Also included in the updated examination procedures are a list of bulletins, guidance, and temporary regulatory changes for examiners to consult as they assess servicers’ compliance with federal consumer financial laws. Examiners are also advised to request information on how servicers are communicating with borrowers about homeowner assistance programs, which can help consumers avoid foreclosure, provided mortgage servicers collaborate with state housing finance agencies and HUD-approved housing counselors to aid borrowers during the HAF application process.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance CFPB Federal Issues Supervision Examination Mortgages Mortgage Servicing Covid-19 Consumer Finance

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  • FHFA outlines MSR guidance for managing counterparty credit risk

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On January 12, FHFA released an advisory bulletin communicating supervisory expectations for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (the Enterprises) related to the valuation of mortgage servicing rights (MSRs) for managing counterparty credit risk. FHFA emphasized that Fannie and Freddie’s “risk management policies and procedures should be commensurate with an Enterprise’s risk appetite[] and based on an assessment of seller/servicer financial strength and MSR risk exposure levels.” FHFA relayed that while sellers and servicers assign values to their MSRs, the Enterprises should implement their own processes to evaluate the reasonableness of seller/servicer MSR values. FHFA explained that Fannie and Freddie are “exposed to counterparty credit risk when seller/servicers provide representations and warranties that mortgage loans conform with its selling guide requirements,” and reiterated that “[f]ailure to meet such obligations and commitments may cause the Enterprise to incur credit losses and operational costs.”

    The advisory bulletin lays out risk management expectations to ensure MSR values are reasonable, objective, and transparent, and provides guidance covering several areas, including (i) objective evaluation of MSR values; (ii) MSR valuations for mortgage loans owned or guaranteed by Fannie and Freddie as well as stress testing; (iii) MSR valuations for mortgage loans not owned or guaranteed by Fannie or Freddie; (iv) market data input; (v) use of third-party providers; (vi) frequency of evaluations; and (vii) discount to MSR values when servicing rights are terminated. The advisory bulletin is applicable only to MSRs for single-family mortgage loans and is effective April 1.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Federal Issues Mortgages Fannie Mae Freddie Mac GSEs Risk Management Credit Risk

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  • HUD discusses steps to address appraisal bias

    Federal Issues

    On January 12, HUD Secretary Marcia L. Fudge announced at a Brookings Institute event that HUD is creating a process that people seeking FHA financing can use to request a review of their appraisal if they believe the results may have been affected by racial bias. According to the announcement, under the reconsideration of value (ROV) proposal, lenders will have clear guidance on how to review requests from borrowers for an ROV for the appraisal conducted in conjunction with their application for FHA-insured mortgage financing. The proposal also provides guidance for obtaining a second appraisal when material deficiencies are documented, and the appraiser is unwilling to resolve them. Fudge noted that the proposal “represents the first step to solidify the processes that lenders must follow when a borrower requests a [ROV] review if concerns arise around unlawful discrimination in residential property valuations.” Fudge also noted that the proposal supports the Biden-Harris administration’s PAVE Action Plan commitments and the continued work of the Interagency Task Force. As previously covered by InfoBytes, in March 2022, HUD delivered the Interagency Task Force on Property Appraisal and Valuation Equity (PAVE) Action Plan to President Biden. PAVE focuses primarily on actions to substantially reduce racial bias in home appraisals, as well as steps federal agencies can “take using their existing authorities to enhance oversight and accountability of the appraisal industry and empower homeowners and homebuyers to take action when they receive a valuation that is lower than expected.”

    Federal Issues Agency Rule-Making & Guidance HUD FHA Discrimination Appraisal Mortgages Consumer Finance

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  • NY restricts lenders’ ability to reset statute of limitations on foreclosures

    State Issues

    In December, the New York governor signed A 7737-B, the “Foreclosure Abuse Prevention Act,” which amends the rights of parties in foreclosure actions. Among other things, the law provides that a lender or servicer’s voluntary discontinuance of a foreclosure action does not reset New York’s 6-year statute of limitations on foreclosures, according to New York CPLR §213. Further, pursuant to the new law, if an action to foreclose a mortgage or recover any part of the mortgage debt is time-barred, any other action seeking to foreclose the mortgage or recover the debt is also time-barred. The amendments are effective immediately and, notably, apply to all pending actions in which a final judgment of foreclosure and sale has not been enforced.

    State Issues New York State Legislation Foreclosure Mortgages Mortgage Servicing Consumer Finance

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  • Agencies highlight downpayment assistance, child privacy in regulatory agendas

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    Recently, the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs released fall 2022 regulatory agendas for the FTC and HUD. With respect to an FTC review of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule (COPPA) that was commenced in 2019 (covered by InfoBytes here), the Commission stated in its regulatory agenda that it is still reviewing comments. COPPA “prohibits unfair or deceptive acts or practices in connection with the collection, use and/or disclosure of personal information from and about children under the age of 13 on the internet,” and, among other things, “requires operators of commercial websites and online services, with certain exceptions, to obtain verifiable parental consent before collecting, using, or disclosing personal information from or about children.”

    HUD stated in its regulatory agenda that it anticipates issuing a notice of proposed rulemaking in March that would address mortgage downpayment assistance programs. The Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2018 amended the National Housing Act to add a clause that prohibits any portion of a borrower’s required minimum cash investment from being provided by: “(i) the seller or any other person or entity that financially benefits from the transaction, or (ii) any third party or entity that is reimbursed, directly or indirectly, by any of the parties described in clause (i).” According to the agenda, FHA continues to receive questions about prohibitions on persons or entities that may financially benefit from a mortgage transaction, including “whether down payment assistance programs operated by government entities are being operated in a fashion that would render such assistance prohibited.” A future NPRM would clarify the circumstances in which government entities are deriving a prohibited financial benefit.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Federal Issues FTC HUD COPPA Downpayment Assistance Mortgages Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security Consumer Protection FHA

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  • FHA seeks feedback on changing reconsideration of valuation requests

    Federal Issues

    Recently, FHA published a draft mortgagee letter (ML) proposing policy changes to its requirements for processing and documenting reconsideration of valuation (ROV) requests, specifically when requests are initiated by a borrower for the review of appraisal results. According to the ML, FHA provided proposed guidance to improve the process when prospective borrowers applying for FHA-insured Title II forward or Home Equity Conversion Mortgages (HECM) request an ROV on a property if the initial valuation is lower than expected, or that there is indication of illegal bias, that Fair Housing regulations have been violated, or that there may be unlawful discrimination. The draft also proposed updated appraisal review standards, which are intended to provide mortgagees and appraisers with clarifying guidance on the quality of an appraisal report and the ROV process and responsibilities. Public comments are due by February 2.

    Federal Issues Agency Rule-Making & Guidance FHA Mortgages HECM Appraisal

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  • National bank to pay $2 million in mortgage fee violation class action

    Courts

    On December 19, the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California granted final approval of a settlement in a $2 million class action resolving allegations that a national bank violated California’s Rosenthal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (RFDCPA) and Unfair Competition Law (UCL). According to the order for preliminary approval, the plaintiff class alleged that the bank improperly charged and collected transaction fees when processing mortgage payments. The district court certified the class, which included “all persons who have or had a California address, and at any time between June 1, 2016 and the date of the Court’s order preliminarily approving the settlement, paid at least one transaction fee to [the defendant] for making a payment on a residential mortgage loan serviced by [the defendant] by telephone, IVR, or the internet.” The district court determined that the settlement agreement was “reasonable and adequate.” The two class representatives who filed the suit were awarded $1,500 each, and their attorneys were awarded $499,000 in fees.

    Courts State Issues California Rosenthal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act Debt Collection Mortgages Class Action Settlement Consumer Finance

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  • District Court grants summary judgment to bank in discriminatory lending suit

    Courts

    On December 19, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois granted summary judgment in favor of a national bank with respect to discriminatory lending allegations brought by the County of Cook in Illinois (County). As previously covered by InfoBytes, the County alleged that the bank’s lending practices were discriminatory and led to an increase in foreclosures among Black and Latino borrowers, causing the County to incur financial injury, including foreclosure-related and judicial proceeding costs and municipal expenses due to an increase in vacant properties. In 2021, the court denied the bank’s motion to dismiss the alleged Fair Housing Act violations after determining that all the County had to do was show a reasonable argument that the bank’s lending practices resulted in foreclosures, and that the bank failed to dispute that the County properly alleged a financial injury sufficient to support standing.

    The court explained in its December 19 order, however, that two of the County’s expert witnesses did not make valid comparisons when measuring the denial rate for minority borrowers compared to white borrowers. According to the court, the expert witnesses failed to properly account for the financial conditions of the borrowers seeking mortgage modifications, leaving the County with “no other evidentiary basis to establish that [the bank] engaged in intentionally discriminatory servicing practices that caused minority borrowers to disproportionately suffer default and foreclosure.” The court found that, accordingly, the County cannot demonstrate “intentional discrimination against minority borrowers that proximately caused the County’s injuries, and its disparate treatment claim accordingly cannot survive summary judgment.” Additionally, the court found that the County failed to cite authority for its arguments that the bank can be liable for loans it purchased “and for which it did not commit any discriminatory acts in servicing” or for loans it originated but sold and never serviced.

    Courts State Issues Illinois Consumer Finance Discrimination Mortgages Mortgage Servicing Fair Lending Fair Housing Act Disparate Impact Foreclosure

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