Skip to main content
Menu Icon Menu Icon
Close

InfoBytes Blog

Financial Services Law Insights and Observations

Filter

Subscribe to our InfoBytes Blog weekly newsletter and other publications for news affecting the financial services industry.

  • Special Alert: FinCEN extends AML program, other requirements to banks without federal regulators

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On September 14, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) issued a final rule to align Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) requirements applicable to most banks with the requirements applicable to banks lacking a “federal functional regulator.” In particular, the final rule will require all non-federally regulated banks — including private banks, non-federally insured credit unions, and certain trust companies — to establish and implement anti-money-laundering (AML) programs and customer identification programs (CIP).

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Financial Crimes FinCEN Bank Secrecy Act Anti-Money Laundering Special Alerts

    Share page with AddThis
  • FinCEN releases ANPRM on enhancing AML programs

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On September 16, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) soliciting comments on questions concerning potential regulatory amendments under the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA). According to the ANPRM, the proposed amendments “are intended to modernize the regulatory regime to address the evolving threats of illicit finance, and provide financial institutions with greater flexibility in the allocation of resources, resulting in the enhanced effectiveness and efficiency of anti-money laundering programs.” The ANPRM stems from FinCEN’s evaluation of recommendations received from the Bank Secrecy Act Advisory Group, which was established in 2019 to develop recommendations for strengthening the national AML regime. The ANPRM proposes, among other things, that all covered financial institutions subject to ALM program regulations would be required to maintain an “effective and reasonably designed” AML program that: (i) “assesses and manages risk as informed by a financial institution’s risk assessment, including consideration of [AML] priorities to be issued by FinCEN consistent with the proposed amendments”; (ii) “provides for compliance with [BSA] requirements”; and (iii) “provides for the reporting of information with a high degree of usefulness to government authorities.” The ANPRM also seeks comments on whether an explicit requirement for a risk assessment process should be established within the AML program regulations, as well as whether FinCEN’s director should issue a list of national AML priorities (tentatively titled “Strategic Anti-Money Laundering Priorities”) every two years. Comments are due by November 16.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance FinCEN Anti-Money Laundering Bank Secrecy Act

    Share page with AddThis
  • FinCEN removes AML exemption for non-federally regulated banks

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On September 14, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) issued a final rule, under its sole authority, to remove the anti-money laundering (AML) program exemption for non-federally regulated banks. According to FinCEN, the rulemaking was prompted by the “gap in AML coverage” between banks that have a federal functional regulator and those that do not, which has created “a vulnerability to the U.S. financial system that could be exploited by bad actors.” The final rule would bring non-federally regulated banks that are currently required to comply with certain Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) obligations, such as filing currency transaction reports and suspicious activity reports to detect unusual activity, into compliance with the same standards applicable to all other banks. Specifically, the final rule outlines minimum standards for non-federally regulated banks to ensure the establishment and implementation of required AML programs, and extends customer identification program (CIP) requirements, as well as beneficial ownership requirements outlined in FinCEN’s 2016 customer due diligence (CDD) rule (covered by InfoBytes here), to banks not already subject to these requirements. FinCEN believes that non-federally regulated banks will be able to take a risk-based approach when tailoring their AML and CIP programs to fit their size, needs, and operational risks, and that those banks should be able to build on “existing compliance policies and procedures and prudential business practices to ensure compliance. . .with relatively minimal cost and effort.” The final rule takes effect November 16.

    For more details, please see a Buckley Special Alert on the final rule. 

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance FinCEN Anti-Money Laundering CDD Rule Bank Secrecy Act Compliance Of Interest to Non-US Persons

    Share page with AddThis
  • FinCEN reiterates criminality of unauthorized SAR disclosures

    Financial Crimes

    On September 1, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) released a statement reiterating that “the unauthorized disclosure of [suspicious activity reports] (SARs) is a crime that can impact the national security of the United States, compromise law enforcement investigations, and threaten the safety and security of the institutions and individuals who file such reports.” FinCEN stated it is aware that a series of articles will be published by various media outlets based on unlawfully disclosed SARs and other sensitive government documents and has referred the matter to the DOJ and the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Inspector General.

    Financial Crimes FinCEN Of Interest to Non-US Persons SARs

    Share page with AddThis
  • Special Alert: FinCEN outlines approach to BSA enforcement

    Financial Crimes

    On August 18, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, which has overall responsibility for administering the Bank Secrecy Act, issued a short statement that, for the first time, publicly outlined its approach to BSA enforcement. Of note, FinCEN indicated that it will not base enforcement actions on an institution’s failure to comply with standards announced solely in a guidance document. Additionally, for the first time, FinCEN listed a nonexhaustive set of factors it will use to determine what enforcement steps should be taken. The statement leaves FinCEN with considerable flexibility in enforcing the BSA, and raises a number of questions for legal and compliance professionals.

    The statement will be of most interest to “financial institutions,” which under the BSA include a wide swath of financial services companies, that are not subject to supervision by a federal prudential regulator authorized to enforce compliance with the BSA; most prudential regulators have their own enforcement guidelines, and the federal banking agencies recently issued a joint statement on BSA enforcement. Companies subject to FinCEN’s BSA enforcement authority, particularly those such as money services businesses without federal prudential regulators, may wish to familiarize themselves with FinCEN’s enforcement factors and tailor their compliance efforts accordingly. The statement also provides implicit guidance on what actions institutions should take upon identification of a potential violation.

    Financial Crimes FinCEN Bank Secrecy Act Bank Supervision Special Alerts Of Interest to Non-US Persons

    Share page with AddThis
  • FinCEN clarifies customer due diligence FAQs

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On August 3, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), in consultation with the federal functional regulators, issued responses to three frequently asked questions (FAQs) concerning customer due diligence (CDD) requirements under the Bank Secrecy Act for covered financial institutions. As previously covered by InfoBytes, the 2016 CDD Rule imposed standardized requirements for financial institutions to identify and verify beneficial owners of legal entity customers, subject to certain exclusions and exemptions. The FAQs follow those issued by FinCEN in July 2016 and April 2018 (covered by InfoBytes here and here), and address procedures to collect customer information, methods to establish a customer risk profile, and obligations to update customer information.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance FinCEN CDD Rule Bank Secrecy Act

    Share page with AddThis
  • FinCEN warns of Covid-19 cybercriminal activity

    Federal Issues

    On July 30, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) issued an advisory to financial institutions to assist in the “detecting, preventing, and reporting” of potential Covid-19 cybercriminal activity. The advisory highlights specific ways cybercriminals are exploiting the Covid-19 pandemic through “malware and phishing schemes, extortion, business email compromise (BEC) fraud, and exploitation of remote applications.” Among other things, the advisory warns that with increased remote access, cybercriminals seek to undermine weak authentication processes to gain unauthorized access to accounts. Moreover, FinCEN and law enforcement have observed increased phishing scams that use Covid-19 themes, such as payments related to the CARES Act, in the subject and body of emails to lure their victims. Regarding ransomware, the advisory notes that “[i]n almost all cases, criminals require ransomware-related extortion payments to be made in [convertible virtual currency].” Lastly, the advisory notes that due to changing business operations, cybercriminals are using BEC schemes to intercept or fraudulently induce payments in the healthcare industry supply chain. The advisory includes a specific list of red flag indicators for financial institutions to be aware of in each category.

    Federal Issues FinCEN Financial Crimes Covid-19

    Share page with AddThis
  • FinCEN warns of virtual currency social media scam

    Financial Crimes

    On July 16, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) issued an alert warning financial institutions about a scam using social media accounts to solicit fraudulent payments denominated in convertible virtual currency (CVC). According to FinCEN, high-profile social media accounts were compromised and used to solicit payments to CVC accounts, with claims that any CVC sent would be “doubled and returned to the sender.” The alert reminds financial institutions to report suspicious transactions involving this type of activity as soon as possible, and that “[a]ny data or information that helps identify the activity as suspicious can be included as an indicator” on their Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) form. The alert notes several indicators to assist financial institutions in identifying activity related to the scam, including (i) communications soliciting payments with misspellings; (ii) social media posts soliciting donations from unverified accounts; and (iii) multiple accounts communicating the same message soliciting funds for an unknown purpose.

    Financial Crimes FinCEN SARs Of Interest to Non-US Persons Virtual Currency

    Share page with AddThis
  • FinCEN updates FATF-identified jurisdictions with AML/CFT deficiencies

    Financial Crimes

    On July 14, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) issued an advisory to inform financial institutions of updates to the Financial Action Task Force (FATF)-identified jurisdictions with “strategic deficiencies” in their anti-money laundering and combating the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) and counter-proliferation financing deficiencies. FATF notes that in response to measures taken by countries in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, it has temporarily paused reviewing most counties with strategic deficiencies. The advisory reminds members that its February 2020 statement High-Risk Jurisdictions Subject to a Call for Action remains in effect and urges “all jurisdictions to impose countermeasures on Iran and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) to protect the international financial system from significant strategic deficiencies in their AML/CFT regimes.” The advisory also emphasizes that financial institutions should consider the Jurisdictions under Increased Monitoring document and consult the list of identified countries when reviewing due diligence obligations and risk-based policies, procedures, and practices. The advisory also outlines AML program risk assessment considerations, as well as suspicious activity report filing guidance.

    Financial Crimes FinCEN Anti-Money Laundering Combating the Financing of Terrorism Of Interest to Non-US Persons FATF

    Share page with AddThis
  • FinCEN advisory warns of Covid-19 scams and money-mule schemes

    Federal Issues

    On July 7, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) issued an advisory alerting financial institutions to potential indicators of Covid-19 imposter scams and money mule schemes (where actors impersonate federal government agencies, international organizations, and charities). The advisory outlines numerous red flag indicators and examples of these types of schemes in order to assist financial institutions in detecting, preventing, and reporting suspicious transactions. FinCEN emphasizes that “no single financial red flag indicator is necessarily indicative of illicit or suspicious activity,” and encourages financial institutions to consider additional contextual information, such as a customer’s historical financial activity and whether a customer exhibits multiple indicators, before making a determination that a transaction is suspicious or otherwise indicative of a potentially fraudulent Covid-19-related activity. FinCEN further advises financial institutions—in line with their risk-based approach to Bank Secrecy Act compliance—to perform additional inquiries and conduct investigations as necessary.

    Federal Issues FinCEN Financial Crimes Covid-19 Fraud Bank Secrecy Act Of Interest to Non-US Persons

    Share page with AddThis

Pages

Upcoming Events