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  • D.C. District Court Rules in Favor of Anonymity When Challenging a CFPB Civil Investigative Demand

    Consumer Finance

    Recently, the District Court for the District of Columbia issued an opinion recognizing a company’s right to maintain privacy when challenging a CFPB Civil Investigative Demand (CID). John Doe Company No. 1 v. CFPB, No. 1:15-cv-1177 (D.D.C. Oct. 16, 2015). After receiving a CID from the Bureau, the Plaintiffs requested that the CFPB allow counsel to be present at a voluntary investigative hearing; the Plaintiffs’ request and subsequent petition to the CFPB were denied. On July 22, 2015, Plaintiffs filed a complaint against the CFPB seeking a temporary restraining order (TRO) and a motion to seal the case, arguing that sealing was appropriate because (i) CFPB investigations are normally nonpublic; and (ii) sealing the case would protect Plaintiffs from the harm that an ongoing investigation would cause if it were disclosed to the public. The court applied a six-factor test established by the D.C. Circuit in United States v. Hubbard to determine whether the court records should be released, considering the need for public access to the documents, the strength of the property and privacy interests involved, the possibility of prejudice against the Plaintiffs, and other factors. In a “compromise [to maximize] the amount of information available to the public while still protecting the privacy interest Plaintiffs assert,” the court ruled to unseal the case but ordered Plaintiffs to file redacted versions of all files pertaining to the case, omitting the names of Plaintiffs and “any other information reasonably likely to lead to the disclosure of Plaintiffs’ identities.”

    CFPB Enforcement John Doe v CFPB

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  • Massachusetts AG Settles with Auto Lender Over Alleged "Excessive" Interest Rate Charges

    Consumer Finance

    On November 5, Massachusetts AG Maura Healey announced a settlement with a national auto lender to resolve allegations that the lender charged excessive interest rates on subprime auto loans. The company agreed to provide over $5 million – approximately $11,000 per consumer – in relief to those affected by its alleged practice of charging consumers excessive interest rates as a result of including fees from an add-on GAP insurance product. Under the terms of the assurance and discontinuance, the company will (i) eliminate the alleged excessive interest on certain loans as a result of the GAP fee; and (ii) forgive outstanding interest on loans. In addition, the company must pay $150,000 to Massachusetts and perform supervised audits of its existing loan portfolio to ensure that no additional consumers were overcharged because of GAP fees.

    State Attorney General Auto Finance Enforcement

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  • Federal Reserve and New York DFS Announce $258 Million Penalty Against Global Bank

    Federal Issues

    On November 4, the Federal Reserve and the New York DFS announced a combined $258 million penalty against a global bank for “violations in connection with transactions on behalf of countries and entities subject to U.S. sanctions.” According to the Fed’s cease and desist order, the bank failed to implement adequate risk management and compliance policies and procedures to “ensure that activities conducted at offices outside the United States complied with applicable OFAC Regulations and were timely reported in response to inquiries by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.” Specifically, the Fed alleged that, from November 2001 to January 2006, foreign offices of the bank processed funds transfers with parties subject to OFAC Regulations through the bank’s New York-based subsidiary and other unaffiliated U.S. financial institutions without having the information necessary to determine that the transactions were consistent with U.S. law. The Fed’s order requires the bank to develop a compliance program that establishes (i) policies and procedures to ensure compliance with applicable OFAC regulations; (ii) an OFAC compliance reporting system; and (iii) requirements for employee training in OFAC-related issues. Under the terms of the DFS consent order, the bank agreed to hire an independent monitor to conduct a comprehensive review of its BSA/AML and OFAC sanctions compliance program, policies, and procedures.

    Federal Reserve Enforcement Sanctions OFAC NYDFS

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  • FTC Partners with Federal, State, and Local Law Enforcement Agencies to Announce Nationwide "Crackdown" on Abusive Debt Collection

    Consumer Finance

    On November 4, the FTC announced the first coordinated federal, state, and local initiative to combat alleged abusive and deceptive debt collection practices, Operation Collection Protection. This announcement included authorities listing 30 new actions, including five enforcement actions by the FTC. These actions targeted the following practices: (i) extracting payments from consumers by using intimidation and inaccurate representations; (ii) impersonating servers or attorneys and threatening arrest or litigation; and (iii) collecting on debts that never existed or had already been paid. These cases bring the total number of actions taken under the Operation Collection Protection initiative this year to 115 and the total number of participating law enforcement partners to 70.

    FTC State Attorney General Debt Collection Enforcement

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  • CFPB Files Suit Against Student Financial Aid Company

    Consumer Finance

    On October 29, the CFPB filed a complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California against a California-based student financial aid operation and its owner (Defendants). According to the complaint, the Defendants represented that by paying a fee and sending in an application, consumers were applying for financial aid or the Defendants would apply for aid on behalf the students. The CFPB alleges, however, that consumers did not receive the promised services in exchange for their payment and that the Defendants collected more than $4 million from at least 76,000 consumers from January 2011 through the filing of the complaint. The CFPB alleges that the Defendants violated the CFPA by (i) deceiving students to pay for services that the Defendants did not actually provide; (ii) using letterhead that falsely indicated affiliation with the government and university financial aid offices; and (iii) pressuring students to enroll in the program and pay a fee by creating false deadlines and making deceptive statements about the consequences of missing the deadlines. The CFPB also alleges that the Defendants failed to provide privacy notices to consumers as required by Regulation P. The complaint seeks a civil money penalty, restitution to harmed consumers, and a prohibition against future violations.

    CFPB Student Lending Enforcement

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  • State-Chartered Bank Settles with New York DFS for Alleged Violations of Banking Law

    State Issues

    On October 28, the New York DFS resolved an enforcement action with a New York State-charted bank for alleged violations of state banking law. The DFS alleged that the bank hired a former New York Federal Reserve Bank examiner and permitted him to work on matters for an entity that the employee had examined while at the New York Fed, in violation of a notice of post-employment restrictions from the New York Fed. The DFS also alleged that the employee obtained confidential regulatory or supervisory information from a now former New York Fed employee and distributed the information to a Managing Director at the bank for the purpose of advising the entity. In addition to the bank’s alleged failure to screen the employee from working on matters related to the entity he had examined, the DFS’s order alleges that the bank failed to “provide training to personnel regarding what constituted confidential supervisory information and how it should be safeguarded.” Under the settlement terms, the bank will (i) pay a civil money penalty of $50 million to the DFS; (ii) reform its policies and procedures to ensure the proper handling of confidential supervisory information and the monitoring of assignments of former government employees; and (iii) not re-hire the bank employee and Managing Director, who had been terminated as result of the matter.

    Bank Compliance Enforcement NYDFS

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  • CFPB Enforcement Action Targets Background Check Company's Screening Practices

    Consumer Finance

    On October 29, the CFPB announced a consent order with a national employment background screening provider and its affiliate for alleged violations of the FCRA. According to the CFPB, the company and its affiliate failed to (i) use reasonable procedures to assure maximum possible accuracy of the information in reports that they provided to employers; (ii) take appropriate measures to ensure that non-reportable information, such as civil suits and civil judgments older than seven years, was not included in reports; and (iii) comply with the requirement to maintain “strict procedures” to ensure complete and up to date information in reports or notify consumers when the reported information was likely to have an adverse effect on their ability to obtain employment. Under the terms of the consent order, the company and its affiliate are required to provide $10.5 million in relief to consumers and pay a $2.5 million civil money penalty. In addition, the company and its affiliate must revise their compliance procedures and hire an independent consultant to assess their policies, procedures, staffing levels, and systems.

    CFPB FCRA Enforcement

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  • CFPB Orders Auto Finance Company to Pay Over Three Million for Alleged Unfair Debt Collection Practices

    Consumer Finance

    On October 28, the CFPB filed an administrative order against an Ohio-based auto lender specializing in extending credit to servicemembers. The CFPB alleged that the company violated the CFPA by engaging in unfair, abusive, and deceptive debt collection practices, including: (i) contacting and threatening to contact servicemembers’ commanding officers to inform them of delinquencies and alleged military violations requiring discipline; (ii) exaggerating the potential disciplinary actions, such as demotion, loss of promotion, and discharge, that servicemembers may face if they failed to make payments; (iii) representing that the company could commence an involuntary allotment or wage garnishment without obtaining a court judgment; and (iv) threatening legal action when the company did not intend to take legal action at the time. Among other things, the consent order requires that the company: (i) refund or credit over $2 million to consumers; and (ii) pay a $1 million civil money penalty.

    CFPB UDAAP Auto Finance Enforcement

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  • Multiple Agencies Take Action Against Paris-Based Investment Bank for Sanctions Violations

    Federal Issues

    On October 20, the DOJ, OFAC, the NYDFS, the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, and the Federal Reserve simultaneously announced that a Paris-based investment bank would pay a total of more than $787 million to settle multiple alleged violations of U.S. sanctions regulations. The OFAC settlement resolves allegations that the investment bank and certain predecessor banks, between August 6, 2003 and September 16, 2008, processed 4,055 transactions – for a total of approximately $337,043,846 – to or through U.S. financial institutions that involved countries and/or persons subject to the sanctions regulations administered by OFAC. The investment bank settled with OFAC for more than $329,500,000, an amount that reflects the agency’s consideration of the following aggravating factors: (i) the investment bank had indications that its actions had the potential to constitute violations of the U.S. law before the earliest date of the apparent violations; (ii) several managers of the investment bank were aware of the conduct that led to the violations; (iii) the investment bank’s conduct resulted in significant harm to various sanctions programs OFAC oversees and their associated policy objectives; (iv) the investment bank’s size and sophistication, along with its global presence; and (v) the investment bank’s failure to maintain proper controls to prevent the violations from occurring and otherwise maintain an adequate compliance program.

    In addition to OFAC’s settlement, parallel actions against the bank resulted in the investment bank agreeing to pay (i) $385 million to the NYDFS; (ii) $90.3 million to the Federal Reserve; (iii) $156 million to the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office; and (iv) $156 million to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia.

    Federal Reserve Compliance DOJ Enforcement Sanctions OFAC NYDFS

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  • FTC Announces Final Consent Orders Against Auto Dealers for Alleged Deceptive Advertising

    Consumer Finance

    On October 20, the FTC announced that, following a public comment period, it approved final consent orders against two Las Vegas auto dealers for allegedly engaging in deceptive advertising practices. In June, the FTC filed two administrative complaints against the auto dealers for (i) misrepresenting the purchase price or leasing offers of vehicles; and (ii) failing to disclose key information in its advertisements, including if a down payment was required at the time of purchase. The final consent orders were unanimously approved in a 5-0 vote by the Commission and prohibit the dealers from (i) engaging in further action that results in violations of the Consumer Leasing Act and the Truth in Lending Act; (ii) misrepresenting the cost of financing or leasing a vehicle; and (iii) stating the down payment amount or percentage without also disclosing repayment terms and the annual percentage rate.

    FTC TILA Auto Finance Enforcement Consumer Leasing Act

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