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  • EU court clarifies conditions for imposing GDPR fines

    Courts

    On December 5, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) issued a judgment clarifying the conditions under which a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) fine can be imposed on data controllers. The judgment is in response to two cases involving GDPR fines: (i) a German case in which a real estate company was fined for allegedly storing personal data for tenants for longer than necessary, and (ii) a Lithuanian case in which a government health center was fined in connection to the creation of an app that registered and tracked people exposed to Covid-19.

    In the judgment, the CJEU clarified that a data controller can only face an administrative fine under the GDPR for intentional or negligent violations—that is, violations for which a data controller was aware or should have been aware of “the infringing nature of its conduct,” regardless of their knowledge of the specific violation. The judgment also held that for a legal person, it is not necessary for the violation to be committed by its “management body,” nor does that body need to have knowledge of the specific violation. Instead, the legal person is accountable for violations committed by its representatives, directors, or managers, and those acting on their behalf within the business scope. Additionally, imposing an administrative fine on a legal entity as a data controller does not require prior identification of a specific person responsible for the violation.

    The judgment also addressed administrative fines for operations involving multiple entities. The CJEU noted that a controller may have a fine imposed upon it for actions undertaken by its processor. The court also clarified that a joint controller relationship arises from the two or more entities participating in determining the purpose and means for processing, and “does not require that there be a formal arrangement between the entities in question.”

    To calculate the amount of an administrative fine under the GDPR, the supervisory authority must consider the notion of an “undertaking” under competition law. The maximum fine must be based on the percentage of the total worldwide annual turnover of the particular undertaking in the preceding business year.

    Courts European Union GDPR Enforcement

  • UK-U.S. data bridge adequacy regulations to come into effect October 12

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    The EU-US Data Privacy Framework (the “Framework”) sets forth a set of principles and requirements that US organizations can comply with and, following certification, be permitted to join the Framework. On October 12, the UK extension to the Framework will come into effect following the UK digital minister’s submission of regulation and the US Attorney General’s designation of the UK as a “qualifying state.”

    This data bridge and the associated framework ensures that the level of protection for UK individual’s personal data, as provided for under UK GDPR, is maintained. The FTC and U.S. Department of Transportation are the independent supervisory authorities for the UK extension, which is administered by the U.S. Department of Commerce.

     

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security Of Interest to Non-US Persons UK EU-US Data Privacy Framework GDPR

  • European Data Protection Board clarifies GDPR transfers

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On July 18, the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) published an information note to provide clarity on data transfers under the GDPR to the United States following the European Commission’s adoption of the adequacy decision as part of the EU-U.S. Data Privacy Framework on July 10. The information note also addresses available redress mechanisms under the framework, as well as a new redress mechanism relating to the area of national security. As previously covered by InfoBytes, the European Commission concluded that the U.S. “ensures an adequate level of protection – comparable to that of the European Union – for personal data transferred from the EU to U.S. companies under the new framework.” With the adoption of the new adequacy decision, personal data can now be transferred securely from the EU to U.S. companies participating in the framework without having to implement additional data protection safeguards.

    The information note clarified that transfers based on adequacy decisions do not require supplementary measures. However, transfers to the U.S. not included in the “Data Privacy Framework List” will require appropriate safeguards, such as standard data protection clauses or binding corporate rules. The EDPB emphasized that U.S. government safeguards put in place in the area of national security (including the redress mechanism) will “apply to all data transfers to the [U.S.], regardless of the transfer tool used.” Additionally, EU individuals whose data is transferred to the U.S. based on the adequacy decision may use several redress mechanisms, including submitting complaints with the relevant U.S. organization, while EU organizations may seek advice from their national data protection authority to oversee related processing activities. Moreover, regardless of the transfer method used for sending personal data to the U.S., EU data subjects can submit complaints to their national data protection authority to utilize the new redress mechanism concerning national security. The national data protection authority, in turn, will ensure that the complaint is sent to the EDPB, which will transmit the complaint to the appropriate U.S. authorities.

    The EDPB noted that the European Commission will conduct a review of the adequacy decision one year after it enters into force to ensure all elements have been fully implemented and are effective. Depending on the findings, the European Commission will decide, in consultation with the EDPB and the EU member states, whether subsequent reviews are warranted.

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security Of Interest to Non-US Persons EU European Data Protection Board GDPR EU-US Data Privacy Framework

  • EU court says banks must meet GDPR obligation on data processing

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On June 22, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) issued a judgment concluding that banks are not exempt from providing information upon request about when and why an individual’s data was accessed. However, banks are not necessarily required to name the people who accessed the data, the CJEU said. The Administrative Court of Eastern Finland issued a request for a preliminary ruling in an action seeking clarification on individuals’ rights when requesting information on data processing. The press release explained that a bank employee (who was also a customer of the bank) discovered that other bank employees consulted his personal data on several occasions. Doubting the lawfulness of these consultations, the now-former employee asked the bank for information on who accessed his data, the exact dates of the consultations, and the reasons why his data had been processed. The bank explained that it had consulted his data to check for a possible conflict of interest, but refused to disclose the employees’ identities, reasoning that this information “constituted the personal data of those employees.” A request made by the former employee to Finland’s Data Protection Supervisor’s Office to order the bank to provide him with the requested information was rejected, so the former employee brought an action before the Administrative Court of Eastern Finland, asking the Court of Justice to interpret Article 15 of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

    The CJEU clarified, among other things, that while the GDPR gives individuals the right to access information about why and when their data was accessed (including information relating to consultation operations carried out on the former employee’s personal data), it does not grant a right to know who accessed the information when following a controller’s instructions “unless that information is essential in order to enable the data subject effectively to exercise the rights conferred on him[.]” The CJEU acknowledged, however, that a “balance will have to be struck between the rights and freedoms in question” and that “[w]herever possible, means of communicating personal data that do not infringe the rights or freedoms of others should be chosen.” Furthermore, the CJEU determined that the fact that the controller is a bank, and that the former employee was both an employee of the bank and a customer, “has, in principle, no effect on the scope of the right conferred on that data subject.”

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security Courts Of Interest to Non-US Persons GDPR Consumer Protection EU

  • U.S., UK enter agreement in principle on data flow

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On June 8, President Biden presented an agreement in principle to allow for the free flow of data between the U.S. and the UK. Announced as part of the administration’s “Atlantic Declaration for a Twenty-First Century U.S.-UK Economic Partnership,” the “data bridge” would facilitate data flows between the two countries while ensuring strong, effective privacy protections. “​​The trusted and secure flow of data across our borders is foundational to efforts to further innovation,” the White House said in the announcement. “We are working to finalize our respective assessments swiftly to implement this framework.” A joint statement issued by the UK Secretary of State for Science, Innovation, and Technology, the Rt. Hon. Chloe Smith MP, and U.S. Secretary of Commerce Gina M. Raimondo reiterated the two countries’ commitment to establishing “a data bridge that would restore a robust and reliable mechanism for UK-US data flows.” The data bridge would also help facilitate data transfers to U.S. organizations that rely on other data transfer mechanisms under UK law, the joint statement said.

    Meanwhile, the U.S. and the EU are working to finalize the EU-US Data Privacy Framework (covered by InfoBytes here)—a replacement for the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield, which was annulled by the Court of Justice of the EU in 2020 after the court determined that data transferred under the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield would not be subject to the same level of protections prescribed by the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation.

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security Of Interest to Non-US Persons EU UK Biden GDPR EU-US Data Privacy Framework

  • France fines facial recognition company additional €5.2 million for noncompliance

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On May 10, the French data protection agency, Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés (CNIL), fined a facial recognition company an overdue penalty payment in the amount of €5.2 million for failing to comply with an October order. As previously covered by InfoBytes, last fall CNIL imposed a €20 million penalty against the company for allegedly violating the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) after investigations found that the company allegedly processed personal biometric data without a legal basis (a breach of article 6 of the GDPR), and failed to take into account an individual’s rights in an “effective and satisfactory way”—particularly with respect to requests for access to their data (a breach of articles 12, 15 and 17 of the GDPR). CNIL reported that the company had two months after receiving the October order to stop collecting and processing data on individuals located in France “without any legal basis, and to delete the data of these individuals, after responding to requests for access it received.” Because the company did not submit proof of compliance within this time frame, CNIL imposed an additional fine on top of the original penalty.

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security Courts Of Interest to Non-US Persons EU France GDPR Enforcement

  • EU court says non-material damages in unlawful data processing may be eligible for compensation

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On May 4, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) issued a judgment concluding that while not every infringement of the EU’s data protection law gives rise, by itself, to a right to compensation, non-material damage resulting from unlawful processing of data can be eligible for compensation. The CJEU reviewed questions posed by the Austrian Supreme Court on whether a mere infringement of the GDPR is sufficient to confer the right to compensation for individuals suffering non-material damages, and whether such compensation is possible only if the non-material damage suffered reaches a certain degree of seriousness. The Austrian Supreme Court also asked the CJEU to clarify what the EU-law requirements are when determining the amount of damages.

    The CJEU clarified that the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) does not set thresholds for the “seriousness” of damages needed to confer a right to compensation. “[I]t is clear that the right to compensation provided for by the GDPR is subject to three cumulative conditions: infringement of the GDPR, material or non-material damage resulting from that infringement and a causal link between the damage and the infringement,” the court said in the announcement. Limiting the right to compensation to non-material damage that reaches a certain threshold requirement would be contrary to the broad conception of “damage” outlined in EU law, the CJEU explained, pointing out that obtaining compensation based on a certain threshold would result in different outcomes depending on a court’s assessment. Moreover, the CJEU emphasized that because the GDPR does not contain any rules governing the assessment of damages, it is up to the each member state’s legal system to prescribe detailed rules for actions intended to safeguard individual’s rights under the GDPR, as well as the criteria for determining the amount of compensation, provided the determination complies with the principles of equivalence and effectiveness. The CJEU explained in its ruling that “an infringement of the GDPR does not necessarily result in damage, and [] that there must be a causal link between the infringement in question and the damage suffered by the data subject in order to establish a right to compensation.”

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security Courts Of Interest to Non-US Persons EU GDPR Consumer Protection

  • EU says EU-US Data Privacy Framework lacks adequate protections

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On February 14, the European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs released a draft motion for a resolution concerning the adequacy of protections afforded under the EU-US Data Privacy Framework. As previously covered by InfoBytes, last October President Biden signed an Executive Order on Enhancing Safeguards for United States Signals Intelligence Activities (E.O.) to address the facilitation of transatlantic data flows between the EU and the U.S. The E.O. also outlined bolstered commitments that the U.S. will take under the EU-U.S. Data Privacy Framework (a replacement for the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield). In 2020, the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) annulled the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield after determining that, because the requirements of U.S. national security, public interest, and law enforcement have “primacy” over the data protection principles of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield, data transferred under the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield would not be subject to the same level of protections prescribed by the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

    In the draft resolution, the Committee urged the European Commission not to adopt any new adequacy decisions needed for the EU-U.S. Data Privacy Framework to officially take effect. According to the Committee, the framework “fails to create actual equivalence in the level of protection” provided to EU residents’ transferred data. Among other things, the Committee found that the government surveillance backstops outlined in the E.O. “are not in line” with “long-standing key elements of the EU data protection regime as related to principles of proportionality and necessity.” The Committee also expressed concerns that “these principles will be interpreted solely in light of [U.S.] law and legal traditions” and appear to take a “broad interpretation” to proportionality. The Committee also flagged concerns that the framework does not establish an obligation to notify EU residents that their personal data has been processed, “thereby undermining their right to access or rectify their data.” Additionally, “the proposed redress process does not provide for an avenue for appeal in a federal court,” thereby removing the possibility for EU residents to claim damages. Moreover, “remedies available for commercial matters” are “largely left to the discretion of companies, which can select alternative remedy avenues such as dispute resolution mechanisms or the use of companies’ privacy [programs],” the Committee said.

    The Committee called on the Commission “to continue negotiations with its [U.S.] counterparts with the aim of creating a mechanism that would ensure such equivalence and which would provide the adequate level of protection required by Union data protection law and the Charter as interpreted by the CJEU,” and urged the Commission “not to adopt the adequacy finding.”

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security Of Interest to Non-US Persons EU Consumer Protection EU-US Data Privacy Framework Biden GDPR

  • U.S. messaging service fined €5.5 million for GDPR violations

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On January 19, the Irish Data Protection Commission (DPC) announced the conclusion of an inquiry into the data processing practices of a U.S.-based messaging service’s Ireland operations and fined the messaging service €5.5 million. The investigation was part of a broader GDPR compliance inquiry prompted by a May 25, 2018 complaint from a German data subject.

    The DPC noted that in advance of the date on which the GDPR became effective (May 25, 2018), the U.S. company updated its terms of service and notified users that, to continue accessing the messaging service, they would need to accept the updated terms by clicking “agree and continue.” The complainant asserted that, in doing so, the messaging service forced users to consent to the processing of their personal data for service improvement and security. 

    The company claimed that when a user accepted the updated terms of service, the user entered into a contract with the company. The company therefore maintained that “the processing of users’ data in connection with the delivery of its service was necessary for the performance of that contract, to include the provision of service improvement and security features, so that such processing operations were lawful by reference to Article 6(1)(b) of the GDPR (the ‘contract’ legal basis for processing).” The complainant argued that, contrary to the company’s stated intention, the company was “seeking to rely on consent to provide a lawful basis for its processing of users’ data.”

    The DPC issued a draft decision that was submitted to its EU peer regulators (Concerned Supervisory Authorities or “CSAs”). The DPC concluded that the company was in breach of its GDPR transparency obligations under Articles 12 and 13(1)(c), and stated that users had “insufficient clarity as to what processing operations were being carried out on their personal data.” With respect to whether the company was obliged to rely on consent as its legal basis in connection with the delivery of the service (including for service improvement and security purposes), the DPC disagreed with the complainant’s “forced consent” argument, finding that the company was not required to rely on user consent as providing a lawful basis for its processing of their personal data.

    Noting that DPC had previously imposed a €225 million fine against the company last September for breaching its transparency obligations to users about how their information was being disclosed over the same time period (covered by InfoBytes here), the DPC did not propose an additional fine. Six of the 47 CSAs, however, objected to the DPC’s conclusion as to the “forced consent” aspect of its decision, arguing that the company “should not be permitted to rely on the contract legal basis on the basis that the delivery of service improvement and security could not be said to be necessary to perform the core elements of what was said to be a much more limited form of contract.”

    The dispute was referred to the European Data Protection Board (EDPB), which issued a final decision on January 12, where it found that, “as a matter of principle, [the company] was not entitled to rely on the contract legal basis as providing a lawful basis for its processing of personal data for the purposes of service improvement and security,” and that in doing so, the company contravened Article 6(1) of the GDPR.

    The DPC handed down a €5.5 million administrative fine and ordered the company to bring its processing operations into compliance with the GDPR within a six-month period. Separately, the EDPB instructed the DPC “to conduct a fresh investigation” that would span all of the company’s processing operations to determine whether the company is in compliance with relevant GDPR obligations regarding the processing of personal data for behavioral advertising, marketing purposes, the provisions of metrics to third parties, and the exchange of data with affiliated companies for the purpose of service improvements.

    The DPC challenged the EDPB’s decision, stating that the board “does not have a general supervision role akin to national courts in respect of national independent authorities, and it is not open to the EDPB to instruct and direct an authority to engage in open-ended and speculative investigation.” The DPC suggested that it is considering bringing an action before the Court of Justice of the European Union to “seek the setting aside of the EDPB’s direction.”

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security Of Interest to Non-US Persons Ireland Enforcement Consumer Protection EU GDPR

  • Irish DPC fines global social media company €390 million over targeted ads

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On January 4, the Irish Data Protection Commission (DPC) announced the conclusion of two inquiries into the data processing practices of a global social media company’s European operations. Collectively, the DPC imposed fines totaling €390 million against the company for allegedly requiring users to accept targeted ads when accepting the company’s social media platform terms of service. Complaints were raised in 2018 by data subjects in Austria and Belgium, claiming that the company violated the GDPR by conditioning access to its services on users’ acceptance of the company’s updated terms of service, thereby “forcing” them to consent to the processing of their personal data for behavioral advertising and other personalized services. The company maintained that once a user accepted the updated terms of service, a contract was formed, and that processing user data in connection with the delivery of its social media services was necessary for the performance of that contract (including the provision of personalized services and behavioral advertising). According to the company, “such processing operations were lawful by reference to Article 6(1)(b) of the GDPR (the ‘contract’ legal basis for processing).”

    The DPC issued draft decisions, finding that (i) the company breached its transparency obligations because the “contract” legal basis for processing was not clearly disclosed to users, but that, (ii) in principle, the GDPR did not preclude the company’s reliance on such basis.

    In accordance with the GDPR, the draft decisions were submitted to DPC’s EU peer regulators (Concerned Supervisory Authorities or “CSAs”). Regarding the question of whether the company had acted in contravention of its transparency obligations, the CSAs agreed with the DPC’s decisions but concluded that higher fines should be imposed. Ten of the 47 CSAs, however, concluded that the company “should not be permitted to rely on the contract legal basis on the grounds that the delivery of personalized advertising . . . could not be said to be necessary to perform the core elements of what was said to be a much more limited form of contract.” The DPC disagreed, arguing that personalized advertising is “central to the bargain struck between users and their chosen service provider” as part of the contract that is established when a user accepts the terms of service. The dispute was referred to the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) after the regulators were unable to reach a consensus.

    The EDPC determined that, “as a matter of principle,” the company “is not entitled to rely on the ‘contract’ legal basis as providing a lawful basis for its processing of personal data for the purpose of behavioral advertising.” The DPC adopted the EDPC’s determination and issued final decisions, finding, among other things, that the company’s processing of users’ data in purported reliance on the “contract” legal basis amounts to a contravention of Article 6 of the GDPR. The decisions require the company to bring its processing operations into compliance with the GDPR within a three-month period and impose administrative fines higher than those originally proposed, in line with the EDPC’s direction to increase the fines.

    The company released a statement following the decisions. According to the company, “[t]here has been a lack of regulatory clarity on this issue, and the debate among regulators and policymakers around which legal bases are most appropriate in a given situation has been ongoing for some time. This issue is also currently being debated by the highest courts in the EU, who may yet reach a different conclusion altogether.” The company added that “we strongly disagree with the DPC’s final decision, and believe we fully comply with GDPR by relying on Contractual Necessity for behavioural ads given the nature of our services. As a result, we will appeal the substance of the decision. Given that regulators themselves disagreed with each other on this issue up until the final stage of these processes in December, it is hard to understand how we can be criticised for the approach we have taken to date, and therefore we also plan to challenge the size of the fines imposed.”

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security Of Interest to Non-US Persons EU GDPR Enforcement

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