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  • SEC charges settlement company with cybersecurity disclosure violations

    Securities

    On June 15, the SEC announced charges against a real estate settlement services company for its role in allegedly failing to disclose controls and procedures related to a cybersecurity vulnerability that exposed sensitive customer information. According to the SEC’s order, an independent cybersecurity journalist warned the company in May 2019 of a vulnerability concerning its system for sharing document images that exposed over 800 million images dating back to 2003, including images containing sensitive personal data such as social security numbers and financial information. In response, the company allegedly issued a press release for inclusion in the cybersecurity journalist’s report published in May 2019 and furnished a Form 8-K to the Commission on May 28, 2019. However, according to the order, the company’s senior executives responsible for these kinds of releases “were not apprised of certain information that was relevant to their assessment of the company’s disclosure response to the vulnerability and the magnitude of the resulting risk.” Specifically, the order states that senior executives were not informed that the company’s information security personnel had identified a vulnerability several months earlier, in January 2019, but failed to remediate the vulnerability in accordance with the company’s policies. The order finds that the company “failed to maintain disclosure controls and procedures designed to ensure that all available, relevant information concerning the vulnerability was analyzed for disclosure in the company’s public reports filed with the Commission.” The SEC charged the company with violating Rule 13a-15(a) of the Exchange Act and ordered the company, who agreed to a cease-and-desist order, to pay a $487,616 penalty.

    Securities Federal Issues Securities and Exchange Commission Enforcement Courts Cease and Desist Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Data Breach

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  • Nevada updates consumer privacy framework

    State Issues

    On June 2, the Nevada governor signed SB 260, which revises certain provisions under the state’s existing privacy law. Among other things, the act (i) adds “data broker” to the existing privacy framework; (ii) exempts certain persons and information collected about a consumer in the state from requirements imposed on operators, data brokers, and covered information, including consumer reporting agencies, personally identifying information regulated by the FCRA or the federal Driver’s Privacy Protection Act, information collected for the purposes of fraud information, publicly available information, and financial institutions; (iii) prohibits a data broker from selling covered information collected about a consumer in the state if so directed by the consumer, and revises provisions related to the sale of certain covered information about a consumer; (iv) requires data brokers to respond to a consumer’s verified request within 60 days after receipt (a data broker may extend this period by no more than 30 days if an extension is determined to be reasonably necessary); (v) provides data brokers and operators 30 days to remedy violations of the opt-out requirement (provided they have not previously failed to comply with the opt-out requirements); and (vi) updates the definition of “sale” to include “the exchange of covered information for monetary consideration by an operator or data broker to another person.” While existing law already provides the Nevada attorney general with the authority to seek injunctive relief and impose civil penalties of no more than $5,000 per violation, the act extends this authority to cover data brokers. Additionally, the act explicitly does not provide for a private right of action against operators. The act takes effect October 1.

    State Issues State Legislation Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Data Brokers Consumer Protection

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  • 11th Circuit affirms majority of $380 million data breach settlement

    Courts

    On June 3, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit affirmed a district court’s approval of a roughly $380.5 million settlement between a class of consumers (plaintiffs) and a large consumer reporting agency (CRA), which resolved allegations arising from a 2017 cyberattack that caused a data breach of the CRA. (Covered by InfoBytes here.) The 11th Circuit’s opinion resolves challenges brought by objectors to the settlement who argued that plaintiffs lacked Article III standing because they did not have their identities stolen, and challenged, among other things, certain procedural requirements, the appropriateness of class certification given the possibility that some class members may have been able to recover state statutory damages, and the district court’s adoption of an approval order “ghostwritten” by plaintiffs’ counsel. The objectors also argued that the settlement was inadequate given the “unique risks associated with stolen social security numbers,” and disagreed with the award of $77.5 million in attorneys’ fees, as well as the district court’s decision to impose appeal bonds of $2,000 on each objector.

    On appeal, the 11th Circuit rejected almost all of the objectors’ arguments after determining that class members—even if they were not victims of identity theft—faced a material risk of harm. The appellate court also held that the procedural requirements were not particularly burdensome given the roughly 147 million class members involved. Moreover, the appellate court concluded that the fact that class members in a couple of states could have argued for statutory damages did not make the named plaintiffs inadequate class representatives. Furthermore, the appellate court noted that (i) the settlement addressed the seriousness of the stolen social security numbers; (ii) attorneys’ fees (equal to 20.36 percent of the common fund) were within the reasonable range; (iii) objectors failed to show any “practice of uncritically adopting counsel’s proposed orders”; and (iv) the district court did not “abuse its discretion when it imposed the appeal bonds based on its finding that there was a ‘substantial risk that the costs of appeal will not be paid unless a bond is required.’” Moreover, the 11th Circuit noted that “[a]bsent the settlement, the class action could have faced serious hurdles to recovery, and now the class is entitled to significant settlement benefits that may not have even been achieved at trial,” adding that the FTC, CFPB, and state attorneys general for 48 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico all support the settlement.

    The appellate court, however, did reverse the district court’s award of incentive payments to class representative and remanded the case solely for the purpose of vacating the awards.

    Courts Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Data Breach Class Action Settlement Consumer Reporting Agency Consumer Data Appellate

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  • FTC alleges subscription service failed to provide access to paid-for services or secure personal data

    Federal Issues

    On June 7, the FTC announced a complaint and proposed consent order against the operators of a movie subscription service to settle allegations that the respondents denied subscribers access to paid-for services and failed to secure subscribers’ personal information. The FTC alleges in its complaint that the respondents violated the FTC Act by employing multiple tactics to prevent subscribers from using the advertised services, including by (i) invalidating subscribers’ passwords while deceptively claiming to have “detected suspicious activity or potential fraud” on the subscribers’ accounts; (ii) imposing a deceptive ticket verification program, which required subscribers to submit photos of physical movie ticket stubs within a certain timeframe in order to view future movies or risk having their subscriptions cancelled; and (iii) using undisclosed financial thresholds known as “trip wires” to block certain subscribers after they reached certain viewing thresholds based on their monthly cost to the company. The FTC also alleged the respondents violated the Restore Online Shoppers’ Confidence Act, by failing to (i) disclose all material terms before obtaining consumers’ billing information; or (ii) obtain consumers’ express informed consent before charging them. Furthermore, the respondents allegedly failed to take reasonable measures to protect subscribers’ personal information, including storing personal data such as financial information and email addresses in unencrypted form and failing to restrict who could access the data, which lead to a data breach in 2019.

    An analysis of the FTC’s proposed consent order notes that the respondents are prohibited from misrepresenting their services and must establish a comprehensive information security program that requires them—and any businesses controlled by the respondents —to implement and annually test and monitor safeguards and take steps to address security risks. The respondents must also obtain biennial third-party assessments of its information security program, notify the FTC of any future data breaches, and annually certify that it is complying with the order’s data security requirements. The FTC noted that because certain respondents have filed for bankruptcy, the order does not include monetary relief.

    Federal Issues FTC Enforcement Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Deceptive UDAP FTC Act ROSCA

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  • FinCEN to host workshop on privacy enhancing technologies

    Financial Crimes

    On May 26, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) announced it will host a special Innovations Hours Program in September “focusing on the important role of privacy-preserving principles in developing technical solutions that enhance financial services innovation while countering illicit activity and national security risks that undermine the integrity and opportunity of the U.S. financial system.” Fintech and regulatory technology (regtech) companies, venture capital firms, and financial institutions interested in providing a demonstration should highlight how their innovative solutions work and how these solutions “may support private- and public-sector efforts to enhance financial integrity, while protecting national security and personal privacy.” Interested companies should submit requests here no later than July 23. As previously covered by InfoBytes, the Innovation Hours Program was announced in 2019 to provide opportunities for fintech/regtech companies and financial institutions to showcase new and emerging approaches to combating money laundering and terrorist financing and to demonstrate how financial institutions could use such technologies.

    Financial Crimes FinCEN Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Fintech

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  • New York AG reaches agreement with online retailer to resolve data breach

    State Issues

    On May 18, the New York attorney general announced an agreement with an online water filtration retailer to resolve an investigation into a 2019 data breach that allegedly compromised the sensitive personal information of roughly 324,000 customers. According to the AG, the data breach impacted the retailer’s website for nearly a year, and compromised information including credit card holders’ names, billing addresses, expiration dates, and security codes. The data breach occurred after attackers exploited a known vulnerability in the retailer’s online checkout process that the retailer had not patched. After a credit card payment system management company notified the retailers of suspicious activity, the retailer conducted an internal investigation that “erroneously concluded” that no breach had occurred. After additional reports of compromise, a credit card company asked the retailer to hire a forensic investigator to review the retailer’s systems, and it was this forensic investigation that ultimately discovered “conclusive evidence” of the breach.

    Under the terms of the assurance of discontinuance, the retailer is required to pay a $200,000 fine, half of which is suspended unless the retailer is found to have “materially misstated its financial condition.” In addition, the retailer is required to adopt several security measures, including (i) creating a comprehensive information security program; (ii) designing an incident response and data breach notification plan to encompass “preparation, detection and analysis, containment, eradication, and recovery”; (iii) incorporating personal information safeguards and controls, “including encryption, segmentation, penetration testing, logging and monitoring, virus protection policy, custom application code change reviews, authentication policy and procedures, management of service providers, and patch management”; and (iv) agreeing to conduct third-party security assessments over the next five years.

    State Issues State Attorney General Enforcement Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security

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  • District Court approves online marketplace data breach settlement

    Courts

    On May 13, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District California preliminarily approved a class action settlement, resolving allegations that a California-based online designer marketplace failed to protect customers’ personal information from a computer hacking group in a May 2020 data breach. The plaintiffs asserted negligence and brought claims under California’s Consumer Privacy Act and Unfair Competition Law after plaintiffs launched an investigation into the cybersecurity incident. The preliminary settlement requires the company to establish a $5 million settlement fund, which would “provide for an estimated $43 payment per participating class member, two years of credit monitoring, and identity restoration services.” The company must also implement several business practice changes to enhance security, including enhancing password protection and implementing a policy regarding minimizing the retention of customers’ personally identifiable information. The settlement also notes that “members subject to identity theft can also obtain fraud resolution assistance to dispute transactions, mediate calls with merchants, and implement fraud alerts.” Class members who do not agree to the settlement may opt out of the settlement by September 16.

    Courts Data Breach Settlement Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Class Action CCPA State Issues

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  • NYDFS, insurance company reach $1.8 million cyber breach settlement

    State Issues

    On May 13, NYDFS announced a settlement with an insurance company to resolve allegations that the broker violated the state’s cybersecurity regulation (23 NYCRR Part 500) by failing to implement multi-factor authentication or reasonably equivalent or more secure access controls. Under Part 500.12(b), covered entities are required to implement such protocols (see FAQs here). NYDFS’s investigation also revealed that the insurance company falsely certified its compliance with the cybersecurity regulation for 2018. Under the terms of the consent order, the company will pay a $1.8 million civil monetary penalty and will undertake improvements to strengthen its existing cybersecurity program to ensure compliance with 23 NYCRR Part 500. NYDFS acknowledged the broker’s “commendable” cooperation throughout the examination and investigation and stated that the broker had demonstrated its commitment to remediation.

    State Issues NYDFS Enforcement 23 NYCRR Part 500 Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Insurance

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  • 6th Circuit affirms dismissal of FACTA credit card receipt suit

    Courts

    On May 11, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit affirmed dismissal of a putative class action for lack of subject matter jurisdiction, holding that while a merchant technically violated the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA) by including 10 credit card digits on a customer’s receipt, the customer failed to allege any concrete harm sufficient to establish standing. According to the opinion, the named plaintiff filed a class action against the merchant alleging the first six and last four digits of her credit card number were printed on her receipt—a violation of FACTA’s truncation requirement, which only permits the last five digits to be printed on a receipt. The plaintiff argued that this presented “a significant risk of the exact harm that Congress intended to prevent—the display of card information that could be exploited by an identity thief,” and further claimed she did not need to allege any harm beyond the violation of the statute to establish standing. The district court disagreed, ruling that the plaintiff “lacked standing because she alleged merely a threat of future harm that was not certainly impending” and that the merchant’s technical violation demonstrated no material risk of identity theft.

    In agreeing with the district court, the 6th Circuit concluded that a “violation of the statute does not automatically create a concrete injury of increased risk of real harm even if Congress designed it so.” Moreover, the appellate court reasoned that the “factual allegations in this complaint do not establish an increased risk of identity theft either because they do not show how, even if [p]laintiff’s receipt fell into the wrong hands, criminals would have a gateway to consumers’ personal and financial data.” The appellate court further concluded, “statutory-injury-for-injury’s sake does not satisfy Article III’s injury in fact requirement” and the court must exercise its constitutional duty to ensure a plaintiff has standing.

    Courts Appellate Sixth Circuit FACTA Credit Cards Class Action Standing Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Consumer Finance

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  • Defendant obligated to indemnify bank in data breach suit

    Courts

    On May 10, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas ordered a defendant hospitality company to reimburse a national bank and its payment processor (collectively, “plaintiffs”) for $20 million in assessments levied against the plaintiffs by two payment brands following a data breach announced by the defendant in 2015. An investigation into the data breach determined that the defendant failed to require two-factor authentication on its remote access software, which contributed to the data breach and violated the payment brands’ security guidelines. The bank paid roughly $20 million to the payment brands and asked the defendant to indemnify it for the assessments. The defendant refused, arguing that its agreement with the bank was not breached because the payment brands’ rules “distinguish between actual and potential data comprises.” Moreover, the defendant stressed that “[b]ecause no evidence indicates that the attackers used the cardholder information” it was not obligated to indemnify the bank. However, the plaintiffs claimed that under the agreement, the defendant agreed to indemnify the bank “if its failure to comply with the brands’ security guidelines, or the compromise of any payment instrument, results in assessments, fines, and penalties by the payment brands.” The plaintiffs filed suit and moved for partial summary judgment on a breach of contract claim. In granting the plaintiffs’ motion for partial summary judgment, the court determined that the hospitality company is contractually obligated to cover the costs, ruling that actual data compromise is not necessary to trigger the agreement’s indemnification guidelines and that the bank does not need to show that the attackers used the payment information.

    Courts Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Data Breach Payment Processors Credit Cards

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