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  • Court certifies two classes in restaurant chain data breach

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On April 15, the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida certified a nationwide class and a California-only class of restaurant customers who claim the restaurant chain’s negligence led to a 2018 data breach that compromised their credit card information. The two classes of consumers include those who made credit or debit card purchases at affected restaurants in March and April 2018, when their data was accessed by cybercriminals, and who incurred reasonable expenses or time spent mitigating the consequences of the breach. The judge certified the classes only on the plaintiffs’ negligence and state Unfair Competition Law (California) claims, and deferred ruling on the class certification related to claims that the restaurants’ parent company breached an implied contract with customers by failing to have adequate cybersecurity protocols. Certifying that claim, the judge stated, could require applying 50 different state laws on the breach of implied contracts. 

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Courts Data Breach Consumer Finance State Issues

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  • NYDFS, insurance broker reach $3 million cyber breach settlement

    State Issues

    On April 14, NYDFS announced a settlement with an insurance broker to resolve allegations that the broker violated the state’s cybersecurity regulation (23 NYCRR Part 500) by failing to report it was the subject of two cyber breaches between 2018 and 2020. Under Part 500.17, regulated entities are required to provide timely notice to NYDFS when a cybersecurity event involves harm to customers (see FAQs here). A September 2019 examination revealed that the cyber breaches involved unauthorized access to an employee’s email account, which could have provided access to personal data, including social security and bank account numbers. NYDFS also alleged that the broker failed to implement a multi-factor authentication as required by 23 NYCRR Part 500. Under the terms of the consent order, the broker will pay a $3 million civil monetary penalty and will make further improvements to strengthen its existing cybersecurity program to ensure compliance with 23 NYCRR Part 500. NYDFS acknowledged the broker’s “commendable” cooperation throughout the examination and investigation and stated that the broker had demonstrated its commitment to remediation.

    State Issues 23 NYCRR Part 500 NYDFS Settlement Enforcement Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Data Breach

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  • FCC pushes on robocall blocking

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On April 13, the FCC took several actions associated with blocking illegal and unsolicited robocalls, including sending cease and desist letters (see here and here) to two carriers that “appear to be transmitting multiple unlawful robocall campaigns” and seeking updated information from all carriers and developers of call-blocking tools to learn more about the tools available to consumers and their effectiveness. Key questions include:

    • Whether the companies are offering call blocking tools to consumers at no charge.
    • How the companies measure the effectiveness of blocking tools.
    • What protections the companies have put in place to ensure that call blocking does not interfere with emergency services.

    In addition to seeking input from the industry, the FCC sent cease and desist letters to two carriers regarding the transmission of illegal robocalls through their networks. The letters warn the carriers that downstream carriers will be authorized to block all of their traffic if they do not take steps within 48 hours to “effectively mitigate illegal traffic.”

     

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance FCC Robocalls Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security

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  • NYDFS updates cybersecurity fraud alert

    State Issues

    On March 30, NYDFS issued an updated cybersecurity fraud alert that warns of other techniques used in a widespread cybercrime campaign targeting public-facing websites. As previously covered in InfoBytes, the update stems from NYDFS’ February 16 cybersecurity fraud alert sent to regulated entities, which described a “widespread cybercrime campaign” designed to steal nonpublic private consumer information (NPI) from public-facing websites and use the stolen NPI to fraudulently apply for pandemic and unemployment benefits. In addition to the techniques previously identified, NYDFS alerts regulated entities of the following additional hacking methods: (i) using web-debugging tools to steal unredacted, plaintext NPI while in transit from the data vendor to the company; and (ii) credential stuffing to gain access to insurance agent accounts and using those agent accounts to steal consumer NPI. To prevent sensitive data from being stolen from public-facing websites, NYDFS advises financial organizations to circumvent displaying prefilled NPI, even in redacted form, and to guarantee that all portals are being guarded by the “robust access controls required by [NYDFS]’s cybersecurity regulation.” The alert also outlines remediation steps that financial institutions should execute to guarantee basic security.

    State Issues NYDFS Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security State Regulators Data Breach 23 NYCRR Part 500 Covid-19

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  • Utah creates certain affirmative defenses for data breaches

    State Issues

    On March 11, the Utah governor signed HB 80, which provides entities an affirmative defense for a data breach if they follow certain cybersecurity industry standards. Among other things, a “person that creates, maintains, and reasonably complies with a written cybersecurity program” that meets specific safeguard requirements to protect personal information and is in place at the time of the data breach has an affirmative defense to claims brought under Utah law or in the courts of the state that allege the person failed to implement reasonable information security controls that resulted in the data breach. A person also has an affirmative defense to claims regarding the failure to appropriately respond to a data breach or provide notice to affected individuals as long as the written cybersecurity program contained specific protocols at the time of the breach that “reasonably complied with the requirements for a written cybersecurity program” for responding to a data breach or for providing notice. HB 80 also outlines the components that a written cybersecurity program must include to be eligible for an affirmative defense, and is effective 60 days following adjournment of the legislature.

    State Issues State Legislation Data Breach Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security

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  • California again modifies CCPA regs; appoints privacy agency’s board

    State Issues

    On March 15, the California attorney general announced approval of additional regulations implementing the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The CCPA—enacted in June 2018 (covered by a Buckley Special Alert) and amended several times—became effective January 1, 2020. According to the announcement, the newly-approved amendments strengthen the language of CCPA regulations approved by OAL last August (covered by InfoBytes here). Specifically, the new amendments:

    • Require businesses selling personal information collected in the course of interacting with consumers offline to provide consumers about their right to opt out via offline communications. Consumers must also be provided instructions on how to submit opt-out requests.
    • Provide an opt-out icon for businesses to use in addition to posting a notice of right to opt-out. The amendments note that the opt-out icon may not be used in lieu of requirements to post opt-out notices or “do not sell my personal information” links.
    • Require companies to use opt-out methods that are “easy” for consumers to execute and that require “minimal” steps to opt-out. Specifically, a “business’s process for submitting a request to opt-out shall not require more steps than that business’s process for a consumer to opt-in to the sale of personal information after having previously opted out.” Additionally, except as otherwise permitted by the regulations, companies are prohibited from requiring consumers to provide unnecessary personal information to implement an opt-out request, and may not require consumers to click through or listen to reasons as to why they should not submit an opt-out request. The amendments also state that businesses cannot require consumers “to search or scroll through the text of a privacy policy or similar document or webpage to locate the mechanism for submitting a request to opt-out.”

    The AG’s press release also notes that the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), which was approved by voters last November and sought to amend the CCPA, will transfer some of the AG’s responsibilities to the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA), covered by InfoBytes here; however, the AG will retain the authority to go to court to enforce the law. Enforcement of the CPRA will begin in 2023.

    Additionally, on March 17, the California governor announced appointments to the five-member inaugural board for the CPPA, consisting of experts in privacy, technology, and consumer rights. The CPPA is tasked with protecting the privacy rights of consumers over their personal information, and “will have full administrative power, authority, and jurisdiction to implement and enforce” the CCPA and the CPRA, including bringing enforcement actions before an administrative law judge.

    State Issues State Regulators CCPA State Attorney General Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security CPRA CPPA Consumer Protection

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  • States reach data breach settlement with debt collector

    State Issues

    On March 11, a coalition of 41 state attorneys general, led by the New York attorney general, announced a settlement with a bankrupt debt collection agency to resolve a multistate investigation into a 2019 data breach that allegedly exposed the personal information of more than 21 million individuals, including Social Security numbers, payment card information, and in certain instances, medical test names and diagnostic codes. According to the proposed consent order, an unauthorized user accessed the company’s internal system and accessed consumers’ personal information. The AGs claimed that “[d]espite numerous warnings from banks that processed its payments about a potential breach, [the company] failed to detect the intrusion.” Under the terms of the settlement, the company has agreed to implement data security practices to strengthen its information security program and safeguard consumers’ personal information. These measures include: (i) creating and implementing an information security program that includes an incident response plan; (ii) employing a chief information security officer to oversee data safety practices; and (iii) hiring a third-party assessor to conduct an information security assessment. Additionally, should the company fail to honor the injunctive terms of the settlement it may be liable for as much as $21 million.

    State Issues State Attorney General Data Breach Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Settlement

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  • Non-signatory may not arbitrate privacy claims

    Courts

    On March 9, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York denied a global technology company’s motion to compel arbitration in a putative consumer privacy class action, ruling that the technology company is not party to a co-defendant telecommunications company’s terms and conditions, which require consumer disputes to be arbitrated. The proposed class alleged that the defendants “engaged in false, deceptive and materially misleading consumer-oriented conduct” in violation of state law “by ‘failing to disclose that its practice of recycling phone numbers linked to SIM cards, and selling those SIM cards to consumers without requiring prior users to manually disassociate their [] IDs from the phone numbers associated with the recycled SIM cards, did not protect the privacy of users’ data and confidential personal information.’” The defendants moved to compel arbitration based on arbitration provisions contained in the telecommunications company’s terms and conditions.

    The court first reserved its decision on one of the plaintiff’s claims because there was an open question as to whether the plaintiff received a copy of the terms and conditions at the time the plaintiff purchased the SIM card. With respect to the other plaintiff’s sole claims against the technology company, the court ruled that the technology company cannot enforce an agreement to which it is not a party. “This general rule stems from the principle that arbitration is a matter of consent, since ‘no party may be forced to submit a dispute to arbitration that the party did not intend and agree to arbitrate,’” the court said. The court also ruled, among other things, that the plaintiff’s claims “do not allege any interdependent or concerted misconduct by” the defendants, and as such they are not so entangled that the plaintiff must arbitrate his claims against the non-signatory technology company.

    Courts Arbitration Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Class Action

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  • NYDFS, mortgage lender reach $1.5 million cyber breach settlement

    State Issues

    On March 3, NYDFS announced a settlement with a mortgage lender to resolve allegations that the lender violated the state’s cybersecurity regulation (23 NYCRR Part 500) by failing to report it was the subject of a cyber breach in 2019. Under Part 500.17, regulated entities are required to provide timely notice to NYDFS when a cybersecurity event involves harm to customers (see FAQs here). A July 2020 examination revealed that the cyber breach involved unauthorized access to an employee’s email account, which could have provided access to personal data, including social security and bank account numbers. NYDFS also claimed that the lender allegedly failed to implement a comprehensive cybersecurity risk assessment as required by 23 NYCRR Part 500. Under the terms of the consent order, the lender will pay a $1.5 million civil monetary penalty, and will make further improvements to strengthen its existing cybersecurity program to ensure compliance with 23 NYCRR Part 500. NYDFS acknowledged that the mortgage lender had controls in place at the time of the cyber incident and implemented additional controls since the incident. NYDFS also acknowledged the mortgage lender’s “commendable” cooperation throughout the examination and investigation and stated that the lender had demonstrated its commitment to remediation.

    State Issues State Regulators NYDFS Enforcement Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Settlement Mortgages Data Breach 23 NYCRR Part 500

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  • Virginia enacts comprehensive consumer data privacy framework

    State Issues

    On March 2, the Virginia governor enacted the Consumer Data Protection Act (CDPA), which establishes a framework for controlling and processing consumers’ personal data in the Commonwealth. Virginia is now the second state in the nation to enact a comprehensive consumer privacy law. In 2018, California became the first state to put in place significant consumer data privacy measures (covered by a Buckley Special Alert). As previously covered by InfoBytes, under the CDPA, consumers will be able to access their personal data; make corrections; request deletion of their data; obtain a copy of their data in a portable format; and opt out of targeted advertising, sale of their data, or “profiling in furtherance of decisions that produce legal or similarly significant effects concerning the consumer.” The CDPA also outlines controller responsibilities, including a requirement that, among other things, controllers must enter into data processing agreements with data processors that outline instructions for processing personal data and require the deletion or return of personal data once a service is concluded. While the CDPA explicitly prohibits a private right of action, it does grant the state attorney general excusive authority to enforce the law and seek penalties of no more than $7,500 per violation. Additionally, upon discovering a potential violation of the CDPA, the attorney general must give the data controller written notice and allow the data controller 30 days to cure the alleged violation before the attorney general can file suit. The CDPA takes effect January 1, 2023.

    State Issues State Legislation Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Consumer Data Protection Act

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