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  • Special Alert: CFPB Finalizes Additional Amendments to ATR/QM Rule; Agencies Propose Appraisal Rule Amendments

    Consumer Finance

    On July 10, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau ("Bureau") finalized important amendments (the "Amendments") to its ability-to-repay / qualified mortgage rule (the "QM / ATR Rule") that are intended to ease certain compliance challenges with making qualified mortgages ("QMs"). In response to industry concerns on the extensive underwriting requirements in Regulation Z's new Appendix Q, the Bureau acknowledged that certain of its provisions were "not well-suited to function as regulatory requirements" and, as a result, finalized major revisions to the methodology for determining a consumer's monthly debt and income for purposes of making a QM under the 43% debt-to-income ("DTI") underwriting alternative.

    The Amendments, which had been proposed in April of this year (the "April Proposal"), also finalize clarifications to its mortgage servicing and escrows rules that were issued this January.  Like the mortgage rules themselves, the Amendments will take effect on January 10, 2014.

    Separately, on the same date, the Bureau, together with the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Federal Housing Finance Agency, National Credit Union Administration, and Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the "Agencies") issued proposed amendments to their January 2013 final rule governing appraisal practices.

     Click here to read the special alert.

    Questions regarding the matters discussed in this Alert may be directed to any of our lawyers listed below, or to any other BuckleySandler attorney with whom you have consulted in the past.

    CFPB Appraisal Qualified Mortgage

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  • Special Alert: Analysis of Final ECOA and HPML Appraisal Rules

    Lending

    On January 18, the federal banking agencies issued a final rule amending Regulation Z to implement certain requirements from the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the Dodd-Frank Act) that require creditors to obtain appraisals for a subset of loans called Higher-Priced Mortgage Loans (HPMLs), and to notify consumers who apply for these loans of their right to a copy of appraisal. On the same day, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued a final rule under the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA), as amended by the Dodd-Frank Act, to require creditors to provide residential mortgage loan applicants with a copy of any and all appraisals and other written valuations developed in connection with an application for closed or open-end credit that is to be secured by a first lien on a dwelling.  Both rules take effect on January 18, 2014.  BuckleySandler has prepared a Special Alert that provides additional details regarding the HPML appraisal rule, as well as a Special Alert regarding the ECOA appraisal rule.

    CFPB TILA Dodd-Frank ECOA Appraisal

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  • FDIC Approves Joint-Agency Appraisal Rule for Higher-Risk Mortgages

    Lending

    On January 18, the Federal Reserve Board, the OCC, the FDIC, the NCUA, the FHFA, and the CFPB issued a final rule to implement Dodd-Frank Act amendments to TILA that require creditors to meet certain appraisal conditions before making a higher-risk loan. The rule uses the term “higher-priced mortgage loan,” which covers: (i) a loan for which the APR exceeds the average prime offer rate (an average market rate) by 1.5 percent for a first-lien loan, (ii) 2.5 percent for a first-lien jumbo loan, and (iii) 3.5 percent for a subordinate-lien loan. For such loans, the final rule requires that a creditor obtain a written appraisal from a certified or licensed appraiser that is based on a physical property visit of the interior of the property. During the application process, the creditor must issue a disclosure stating (i) the purpose of the appraisal, (ii) that the creditor will provide the applicant a copy of any written appraisal, and (iii) that the applicant may choose to have a separate appraisal conducted at his or her own expense. The creditor must provide the borrower with a free copy of any written appraisals at least three business days before closing. Additional appraisal requirements apply under certain circumstances. As did the proposed rule, and consistent with the statute, the final rule exempts loans that are considered “qualified mortgages,” as recently defined by the CFPB, as well as reverse mortgages, loans secured by manufactured homes, and certain other loans.

    On the same day, the CFPB issued a related rule to implement a Dodd-Frank Act provision that adds similar appraisal requirements to ECOA. The final rule generally mirrors the rule as proposed and requires that for any loan to be secured by a first lien on a dwelling, a creditor must (i) notify applicants within three business days of receiving an application of their right to receive a free copy of written appraisals and valuations and (ii) provide applicants a free copy of all written appraisals and valuations promptly after receiving them, but in no case later than three business days prior to closing on the mortgage. The rule prohibits creditors from charging additional fees for providing a copy of written appraisals and valuations, and allows applicants to waive the three day requirement, provided a copy of all written appraisals and valuations are provided at or prior to closing. Together, the revisions to TILA and ECOA, as implemented by these rules, require creditors to provide two appraisal disclosures to consumers applying for a higher-risk loan secured by a first lien on a borrower’s principal dwelling. The rules take effect January 18, 2014.

    CFPB Mortgage Origination Appraisal

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  • Federal Regulators Propose New Appraisal Rules

    Lending

    On August 15, the Federal Reserve Board, the OCC, the FDIC, the NCUA, the FHFA, and the CFPB proposed new appraisal requirements for certain “higher-risk loans.” The new requirements apply to loans for which the APR exceeds the average market rate by 1.5 percent for first-lien loans, 2.5 percent for first-lien jumbo loans, and 3.5 percent for subordinate-lien loans. The proposal exempts loans that are considered “qualified mortgages” as defined under a separate CFPB rulemaking to implement TILA section 129C, as well as reverse mortgages and loans secured by manufactured homes. The rule would implement amendments to TILA under the Dodd-Frank Act that require creditors to meet certain appraisal conditions before making a higher-risk loan. A creditor would have to obtain a written appraisal from a certified or licensed appraiser that is based on a physical property visit of the interior of the property. At application, the creditor would have to issue a disclosure stating the purpose of the appraisal, that the creditor will provide the applicant a copy of any written appraisal, and that the applicant may choose to have a separate appraisal conducted at his or her own expense. The creditor also would have to provide the borrower with a free copy of any written appraisals at least three business days before closing. Additional appraisal requirements would apply under certain circumstances.

    Concurrently, the CFPB proposed a rule to implement a Dodd-Frank Act provision that adds similar appraisal requirements to ECOA. According to the proposal, for any loan to be secured by a first lien on a dwelling, a creditor would have to (i) notify applicants within three business days of receiving an application of their right to receive a free copy of written appraisals and valuations and (ii) provide applicants a free copy of all written appraisals and valuations promptly after receiving them, but in no case later than three business days prior to closing on the mortgage. The proposed rule prohibits creditors from charging additional fees for providing a copy of written appraisals and valuations. Applicants would be permitted to waive the three day requirement, provided a copy of all written appraisals and valuations is provided at or prior to closing. Together, the revisions to TILA and ECOA, as implemented by the proposed rules, would require creditors to provide two appraisal disclosures to consumers applying for a higher-risk loan secured by a first lien on a borrower’s principal dwelling. Comments on both rules are due by October 15, 2012.

    CFPB Dodd-Frank Mortgage Origination Appraisal

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