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  • Health insurer to pay $48 million to resolve 2014 data breach

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On September 30, a multistate settlement was reached between a health insurance company and a collation of 42 state attorneys general and the District of Columbia to resolve a 2014 data breach that allegedly comprised the personal information of more than 78 million customers nationwide. According to the states, cyber attackers infiltrated the company’s systems using malware installed through a phishing email. The data breach resulted in the exposure of consumers’ social security numbers, birthdays, and other personal data. Under the terms of the settlement, the health insurer must pay $39.5 million in penalties and fees, and is required to (i) not misrepresent the extent of its privacy and security protections; (ii) implement a comprehensive information security program, including “regular security reporting to the Board of Directors and prompt notice of significant security events to the CEO”; (iii) implement specific security requirements, including “anti-virus maintenance, access controls and two-factor authentication, encryption, risk assessments, penetration testing, and employee training”; and (iv) schedule third-party assessments and audits for three years.

    Separately, the California AG reached a $8.69 million settlement, subject to court approval, in a parallel investigation, which requires the health insurer to, among other things, implement changes to its information security program and fix vulnerabilities to prevent future data breaches.

    Previously in 2018, the health insurer reached a $115 million class action settlement, which provided for two years of credit monitoring, reimbursement of out-of-pocket costs related to the breach, and alternative cash payment for credit monitoring services already obtained (covered by InfoBytes here).

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Courts Settlement Data Breach State Issues State Attorney General

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  • California AG, former FTC chairs argue about federal privacy law preemption during Senate committee hearing

    Federal Issues

    On September 23, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation held a hearing titled, “Revisiting the Need for Federal Data Privacy Legislation.” The hearing examined the current state of consumer data privacy and legislative efforts to provide baseline data protections for American consumers, and examined the lessons learned from the EU’s Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and recently enacted state privacy laws. Witnesses included a number of former chairs and commissioners of the FTC, along with California Attorney General Xavier Becerra.

    Becerra discussed the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which sets forth various requirements for businesses that collect, transfer, or sell a consumer’s personal information, and provides California residents several rights, including the right to know what data companies have collected on them and the right to ask to delete data or opt-out of its sale. (See continuing InfoBytes coverage on the CCPA here.) Concerning future federal privacy legislation, Becerra stressed that any such legislation should not preempt the work happening at the state level, and he urged the Committee “to favor legislation that sets a federal privacy-protection floor rather than a ceiling,” in order to allow states the opportunity to provide tailored protections for their residents. Becerra also stressed that the ideal federal legal framework would “recognize[] that privacy protections must keep pace with innovation,” and further addressed the need for a meaningful enforcement regime that respects the work undertaken by the states.

    Former FTC chairs Jon Leibowitz and Maureen Ohlhausen, however, argued (see here and here) in favor of federal preemption. They suggested that a single national comprehensive privacy standard would be stronger and more comprehensive than existing regimes such as the CCPA and GDPR, and could better serve consumers even if it replaces state regulations. Both stressed that preempting state laws should not mean weakening protections for consumers. Moreover, both Leibowitz and Ohlhausen emphasized that federal privacy legislation should be technology- and industry-neutral, with rigorous standards backed by tough enforcement. Leibowitz also urged Congress to provide the FTC with the ability to impose civil penalties on violators for first-time offenses, and recommended that the FTC be granted the primary authority to administer the law and be given continued authority to provide redress directly to consumers. Former chair William Kovacic presented a different approach, which would establish a domestic privacy network to promote cooperation and coordination between federal and state privacy regulators to improve policy formation.

    Other topics covered in the hearing included Chairman Roger Wicker’s (R-MS) recently introduced bill (S. 4626), known as the SAFE DATA Act, which would require businesses to be more transparent about their data collection, processing, and transfer activities, and give consumers more choices and control over their data. Among other things, the bill would preempt privacy laws in California and other states, except in regard to data breaches, and would not include a private right of action allowing consumers to sue over privacy violations.

    Federal Issues Federal Legislation Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Data Breach State Issues State Attorney General

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  • California AG enters into privacy settlement with fertility-tracking mobile app

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On September 17, the California attorney general announced a settlement with a technology company that operates a fertility-tracking mobile app to resolve claims that security flaws put users’ sensitive personal and medical information at risk in violation of state consumer protection and privacy laws. According to the complaint filed in the Superior Court for the County of San Francisco, the company’s app allegedly failed to adequately safeguard and preserve the confidentiality of medical information by, among other things, (i) allowing access to user information without the user’s consent, by failing to “authenticate the legitimacy of the user to whom the medical information was shared”; (ii) allowing a password-change vulnerability to permit unauthorized access and disclosure of information stored in the app without the user’s consent; (iii) making misleading statements concerning implemented security measures and the app’s ability to protect consumers’ sensitive personal and medical information from unauthorized disclosure; and (iv) failing to implement and maintain reasonable security procedures and practices.

    Under the terms of the settlement, the company—which does not admit liability—is required to pay a $250,000 civil penalty and incorporate privacy and security design principles into its mobile apps. The company must also obtain affirmative authorization from users before sharing or disclosing sensitive personal and medical information, and must allow users to revoke previously granted consent. Additionally, the company is required to provide ongoing annual employee training concerning the proper handling and protection of sensitive personal and medical information, in addition to training on cyberstalking awareness and prevention. According to the AG’s press release, the settlement also includes “a first-ever injunctive term that requires [the company] to consider how privacy or security lapses may uniquely impact women.”

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Courts Settlement Data Breach State Issues State Attorney General

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  • New York AG settles data breach lawsuit with national coffee chain

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On September 15, the New York attorney general announced a settlement with a national franchisor of a coffee retail chain to resolve allegations that the company violated New York’s data breach notification statute and several state consumer protection laws by failing to protect thousands of customer accounts from a series of cyberattacks. As previously covered by InfoBytes, the AG claimed that, beginning in 2015, customer accounts containing stored value cards that could be used to make purchases in stores and online were subject to repeated cyberattack attempts, resulting in more than 20,000 compromised accounts and “tens of thousands” of dollars stolen. Following the attacks, the AG alleged that the company failed to take steps to protect the affected customers or to conduct an investigation to determine the extent of the attacks or implement appropriate safeguards to limit future attacks. The settlement, subject to court approval, would require the company to (i) notify affected customers, reset their passwords, and refund any stored value cards used without permission; (ii) pay $650,000 in penalties and costs; (iii) maintain safeguards to protect against similar attacks in the future; and (iv) develop and follow appropriate incident response procedures.

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Courts Settlement Data Breach State Issues

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  • District court approves MDL data breach settlement

    Courts

    On July 21, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California issued an order approving a $117.5 million class action settlement, including $23 million in attorneys’ fees, with a global internet company to resolve multidistrict litigation concerning the exposure of class members’ sensitive information stemming from multiple data breaches. The settlement approval follows a fairness hearing, as the court originally denied preliminary approval due to several identified deficiencies (covered by InfoBytes here), including that the settlement inadequately disclosed the sizes of the settlement fund and class, as well as the scope of non-monetary relief, and “appear[ed] likely to result in an improper reverter of attorneys’ fees.” Last July, the court preliminarily signed off on a revised settlement, conditionally certifying a class of U.S. and Israeli residents and small businesses with accounts between 2012 and 2016 that were affected by the breaches. These class members have been certified in the final approved settlement, which requires the company to provide class members with either two years of credit monitoring services or alternative compensation for members who already have credit monitoring. Among other things, the company will allocate at least $66 million each year to its information security budget until 2022, will increase the number of full-time security employees from current levels, and will “align its information security program with the National Institute of Standards and Technology Cybersecurity Framework” and “undertake annual third-party assessments to ensure compliance” with the framework.

    Courts MDL Settlement Attorney Fees Class Action Data Breach Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security

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  • District court allows data breach claim to proceed against national credit reporting agency

    Courts

    On July 8, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York allowed a consumer’s claim under New York’s consumer protection law (N.Y. G.B.L. § 349) to proceed against a national credit reporting agency (CRA) for grievances stemming from a 2017 data breach that compromised the consumer’s personal information. According to the opinion, the consumer alleged that the CRA, among other things, failed to “implement security and privacy measures to safeguard plaintiff’s sensitive information and misrepresented to him that his personal data would be protected from outside threats.” The CRA had previously entered into a class action settlement concerning the data breach and resolved hundreds of data breach cases brought against the company; however, the consumer opted out of that nationwide class action. The CRA moved to dismiss the consumer’s action, arguing, among other things, that data breach claims are not actionable under N.Y. G.B.L. § 349. While the court granted the CRA’s motion as to the consumer’s FCRA claim, the court denied the CRA’s request to dismiss the consumer’s claim under N.Y. G.B.L. § 349. Specifically, the court concluded that the consumer plausibly alleged the CRA misrepresented its ability to protect the consumer’s personal information, which “resulted in actual and pecuniary harm after [the consumer]’s identity was stolen and numerous unauthorized accounts were opened under his name.” The court distinguished this claim from the consumer’s FCRA claim, which asserted the CRA failed to “shield” the consumer’s information from the hackers, whereas the N.Y. G.B.L. § 349 claim rests on the CRA’s representations of protection.

    Courts Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Credit Report Credit Reporting Agency Data Breach

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  • District court requires bank to produce consultant’s data breach report

    Courts

    On May 26, a magistrate judge of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia ordered a national bank to produce to plaintiffs in litigation a forensic analysis performed by a cybersecurity consulting firm regarding the bank’s 2019 data breach, concluding the report was not entitled to work product protection. As previously covered by InfoBytes, in July 2019, the national bank announced that an unauthorized individual had obtained personal information of credit card customers and people who had applied for credit card products. According to the order, after the data breach, the bank’s outside counsel directed a cybersecurity company, which had been engaging in periodic work with the bank since 2015, to prepare a report “‘detailing the technical factors that allowed the criminal hacker to penetrate [the bank]’s security.’” Plaintiffs, in a class action against the bank for the data breach, sought to obtain the report in discovery, but the bank opposed the production, arguing that the report was protected work product created under an agreement with outside counsel in anticipation of litigation.

    The court rejected the bank’s argument, concluding that the bank did not show the consultant’s scope of work under the outside counsel agreement “was any different than the scope of work for incident response services,” and that the bank had not shown the firm would not have performed the services “without the prospect of litigation.” Moreover, the court noted, “[t]he retention of outside counsel does not, by itself, turn a document into work product.” The court compelled production, holding that the report was not entitled to protection under the work product doctrine.

    Courts Discovery Data Breach Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security

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  • Financial institutions, CRA reach settlement over 2017 data breach

    Courts

    On May 15, a putative class of financial institutions filed an unopposed motion for preliminary approval of a settlement in a multidistrict litigation stemming from a credit reporting agency’s (CRA) 2017 data breach. The class, comprised of financial institutions that issued credit or debit cards whose information was believed to have been breached, argued that the data breach was the result of the CRA’s alleged failure to implement the necessary precautions to safeguard consumers’ personally identifiable information (PII). The class further contended that financial institutions suffer the primary harm caused by identity theft, because they “bear the risk of loss when identity thieves use a customer’s PII to open accounts, transfer funds, take out loans, make fraudulent transactions, or obtain credit or debit cards in the customer’s name.”

    The proposed settlement—pending approval from the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia—will require the CRA to pay $5.5 million to class members that submit valid claims, spend at least $25 million over a two-year period on “data security measures pertinent to the [financial intuitions] and their claims,” and cover settlement administration and notice costs, as well as agreed-upon attorney fees, expenses, and named-plaintiff service awards. The motion for preliminary approval states that the CRA will also, among other things, (i) adopt and/or maintain certain measures in order to identify “reasonably foreseeable threats” to PII; (ii) respond to identified vulnerabilities that may impact the confidentiality of PII; (iii) design safeguards to manage risks identified though data security risk assessments; (iv) implement a security control framework consistent with requirements for systems that “store, process, or transmit [p]ayment [c]ard [d]ata in connection with U.S. payment card transactions”; and (v) maintain a compliance program and submit annual certifications to class counsel.

    Courts Settlement Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security MDL Data Breach Credit Reporting Agency

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  • Multi-jurisdiction settlement reached with credit reporting agency over 2017 data breach

    Privacy, Cyber Risk & Data Security

    On April 17, the Massachusetts attorney general announced a settlement with a credit reporting agency (CRA) to resolve a state investigation into a 2017 data breach that reportedly compromised the personal information of nearly three million Massachusetts residents. According to the AG’s 2017 complaint (covered by InfoBytes here), the CRA ignored cybersecurity vulnerabilities for months before the breach occurred and failed to take measures to implement and maintain reasonable safeguards. Under the terms of the proposed settlement, pending final court approval, the CRA will pay Massachusetts $18.2 million and is required to take significant measures to strengthen its security practices to ensure compliance with Massachusetts law. These measures include (i) implementing a comprehensive information security program; (ii) minimizing the collection of sensitive personal information; (iii) managing and implementing specific technical safeguards and controls; (iv) providing consumer-related relief, such as credit monitoring services and security freezes; and (iv) allowing third-party assessments of its data safeguards.

    Earlier, on April 14, the Indiana attorney general also announced that the CRA will pay the state $19.5 million to resolve allegations that it failed to protect Indiana residents whose personal information was exposed in the 2017 data breach. Under the terms of the final judgment and consent decree, in addition to paying $19.5 million in restitution, the CRA must take measures similar to those outlined in the Massachusetts settlement.

    Massachusetts and Indiana were the only two states that chose not to participate in the 2017 multi-agency settlement that resolved federal and state investigations into the data breach and required the company to pay up to $700 million (covered by InfoBytes here).

    Separately, on April 7, the City of Chicago announced a $1.5 million settlement to resolve allegations that the CRA’s failure to employ adequate data-security measures led to the breach.

    Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security State Attorney General Data Breach State Issues Credit Reporting Agency Settlement Massachusetts Indiana

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  • Data breach exposes SBA Emergency Injury Disaster Loan program applicants

    Federal Issues

    On April 21, according to reports, the Small Business Association (SBA) acknowledged that it notified almost 8,000 applicants of the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program that their information may have been exposed as part of a data breach. Specifically, the agency stated that on March 25, the personal information of business owners applying for the EIDL program was potentially exposed to other applicants on the SBA’s website. The information exposed included names, social security numbers, birth dates, certain financial information, email addresses, and phone numbers. According to the SBA, there is no evidence that the exposed information has been misused. Notably, the breach only effected the applicants of the EIDL program, not the Paycheck Protection Program, which did not begin accepting applications until April 3.

    Federal Issues Privacy/Cyber Risk & Data Security Covid-19 SBA Data Breach

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