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  • OFAC Updates Cuba-Related FAQs

    Federal Issues

    On July 25, OFAC updated its list of frequently asked questions related to Cuba to clarify requirements applicable to persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction that are providing carrier or travel services to Cuba pursuant to 31 C.F.R. § 515.572. According to new FAQ 38, where such a person is providing travel or carrier services to a customer traveling to or from Cuba under a specific license, OFAC will consider the collection and retention of the traveler’s specific license number to be equivalent to collecting and retaining a physical or electronic copy of the specific license, as required by § 515.572(b)(1). The carrier or travel services provider must maintain a record of the specific license number or a copy of the license for at least five years. Revised FAQ 39 reiterates that authorized carrier or travel service providers must also retain a certification from each customer traveling to or from Cuba indicating the provision of the Cuban Assets Control Regulations that authorizes travel and the names and addresses of the individual travelers for at least five years from the date of the transaction.

    OFAC Cuba

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  • OFAC Updates Cuba-Related FAQs

    Federal Issues

    On July 8, OFAC updated its list of frequently asked questions related to Cuba to add two new FAQs regarding the use of U.S. dollars in certain transactions. New FAQ number 43 clarifies that persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction may use the U.S. dollar to conduct transactions in Cuba or with Cuban nationals if the activity is authorized by or exempt from the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR). FAQ 43 further clarifies that under 31 CFR § 515.584(d), commonly known as the “U-turn” general license, U.S. banking institutions are authorized to process transactions originating and terminating outside the United States provided that neither the originator nor the beneficiary is a person subject to U.S. jurisdiction. This means that transactions related to third-country commerce involving Cuba or Cuban nationals may be processed in U.S. dollars through the U.S. financial system via financial institutions located in the United States that serve as intermediary banks. New FAQ 50 relates to correspondent accounts. Pursuant to a general license in the CACR, U.S. depository institutions are permitted to maintain correspondent accounts at financial institutions that are nationals of Cuba, provided such accounts are used only for transactions that are authorized or exempt under the CACR. FAQ 50 explains that such accounts may be maintained in U.S. dollars, and that transactions necessary to establish and maintain such accounts – including processing funds transfers in U.S. dollars - are authorized. Finally, FAQ 50 notes that financial institutions that are nationals of Cuba remain prohibited from opening correspondent accounts at a U.S. financial institution.

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  • OFAC Updates Cuba-Related Frequently Asked Questions

    Federal Issues

    On April 21, OFAC updated its list of frequently asked questions related to Cuba. The updated document includes eight new FAQs clarifying (i)  that Section 515.584(d) of the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR) permits authorized U-turn transactions to originate or terminate at foreign branches and subsidiaries of U.S. banking institutions; (ii) due diligence expectations for banks processing an authorized U-turn transaction from a sanctions compliance perspective; (iii)  that the importation into the United States of goods previously exported to Cuba for servicing requires a specific license; (iv) requirements regarding the export and reexportation of mixed-origin goods to Cuba; (v) that persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction may provide insurance-related services to persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction and engaging in authorized activity in Cuba; (vi) OFAC license requirements for insurance-related services; (vii) that educational grants, scholarships, or awards may be given to a Cuban state-owned entity; and (viii) the circumstances under which  a person subject to U.S. jurisdiction is authorized to purchase or lease real property in Cuba.

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  • OFAC Updates Cuban Assets Control Regulations

    Federal Issues

    On March 15, OFAC issued a final rule updating the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR), 31 C.F.R. Part 515. The amendments advance policy changes announced by the Obama administration in 2014 by further facilitating travel to Cuba for authorized purposes, expanding the range of authorized financial transactions, and authorizing business and physical presence in Cuba. Regarding financial transactions, the final rule (i) amends section 515.584(d) to authorize certain U-turn payments through the U.S. financial system; (ii) adds new section 515.584(g) to allow U.S. banking institutions to process U.S. dollar monetary instruments presented indirectly by Cuban financial institutions; and (iii) adds new section 515.584(h) to “authorize banking institutions to open and maintain accounts solely in the name of a Cuban national located in Cuba for the purposes only of receiving payments in the United States in connection with transactions authorized pursuant to or exempt from the prohibitions of this part and remitting such payments to Cuba.”

    OFAC’s amendments to the CACR were published in the Federal Register on March 16, 2016 and are effective immediately. OFAC simultaneously released a revised set of FAQs and a fact sheet regarding the changes set forth in the CACR.

    Department of Treasury OFAC Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

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  • OFAC Issues Amendments to Cuba Sanctions Regulations

    Federal Issues

    On January 26, OFAC announced amendments to the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR) to further implement policy changes announced by the Obama Administration on December 17, 2014. The regulatory changes will, among other things, “remove existing restrictions on payment and financing terms for authorized exports and reexports to Cuba of items other than agricultural items and commodities, and establish a case-by-case licensing policy for exports and reexports of items to meet the needs of the Cuban people, including those made to Cuban state-owned enterprises.” Significantly, under the amendments, U.S. depository institutions will be authorized to provide financing for authorized exports and reexports, including issuing a letter of credit. Prior to the amendments, cash-in-advance or third-country financing were the only financing options available for authorized exports.

    OFAC issued new FAQs to address the amended CACR, which were published in the Federal Register on January 27, 2016 and are effective immediately.

    Sanctions OFAC Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

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  • OFAC Updates Cuban Assets Control Regulations Easing Sanctions on Cuba

    Federal Issues

    On September 18, OFAC issued a final rule amending the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR) to reflect policy changes previously announced by the Obama administration. With respect to financial transactions, the amendments, among other things, (i) permit certain additional persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction to open and maintain bank accounts in Cuba to use for authorized purposes; (ii) removes limitations on donative remittances to Cuban nationals, on certain authorized remittances that authorized travelers may carry to Cuba, and on the amount of remittances that a Cuban national permanently resident in Cuba who is departing from the U.S. may carry to Cuba; (iii) adds a new general license authorizing remittances from Cuba and Cuban nationals to the United States; (iv) adds a new general license authorizing the unblocking and return of certain previously blocked remittances and funds transfers in certain circumstances; and (v) authorizes U.S. depository institutions to maintain accounts for Cuban nationals while the Cuban-national account holder is located outside the United States, provided that the account holder may only access the account while lawfully present in the United States, and removes a cap on payments from blocked accounts held by Cuban nationals in the United States in a nonimmigrant status to use for living expenses. The amendments also relax restrictions previously set forth in the telecommunications and internet sector, on travel between the U.S. and Cuba, and other various activities. Revisions to the CACR take effect on September 21, 2015.

    At the same time, OFAC published a set of new and revised FAQs addressing the changes set forth in the updated CACR.

    Sanctions OFAC Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

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  • OFAC Publishes Guidance Regarding Travel Between U.S. and Cuba, Releases Updated FAQs Regarding Cuba-Related Sanctions

    Federal Issues

    On May 5, OFAC issued new Guidance Regarding Travel Between the U.S. and Cuba, which provides information on the types of individuals and cargo that can be transported between the U.S. and Cuba by a licensed air carrier or commercial passenger vessel. With respect to individuals, the guidance addressed persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction, Cuban nationals, and other individuals, including foreign nationals, travelling on official government business.  The guidance regarding cargo addressed, among other things, alcohol and tobacco products.  In a separate announcement released on April 16 (and later updated on May 5), OFAC issued new and updated Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) related to the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR). The updated FAQs follow a January 15 announcement in which OFAC issued a final rule amending the CACR to reflect policy changes previously announced by President Obama in 2014.

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  • Treasury Eases Cuba Regulations

    Federal Issues

    On January 15, the Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced a final rule amending its Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR) to reflect policy changes previously announced by President Obama on December 17. The amendments (i) allow U.S. financial institutions to maintain correspondent accounts at Cuban financial institutions; (ii) allow U.S. financial institutions to enroll merchants and process credit and debit card transactions for travel-related and other transactions consistent with the CACR; (iii) increase the limit of remittances to $2,000 from $500 per quarter; and (iv) under an expanded license, allow U.S. registered brokers or dealers in securities and registered money transmitters to process authorized remittances without having to apply for a specific license. In addition, OFAC released a FAQ sheet to help explain the new amendments, which are effective January 16.

    Department of Treasury Sanctions Remittance OFAC

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  • OFAC Settles with Independent Manufacturer for Alleged Violations of the Cuban Assets Control Regulations

    Federal Issues

    Recently, OFAC settled with a Portland, Oregon based manufacturer for allegedly violating the Cuban Assets Control Regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 515. The manufacturer agreed to pay $2,057,540 for the actions of its subsidiary, which “purchased nickel briquettes made or derived from Cuban-origin nickel between on or about November 7, 2007, and on or about June 11, 2011.” OFAC concluded that the manufacturer self-disclosed the supposed violations and such violations “constitute a non-egregious case.” Under the Economic Sanctions Enforcement Guidelines, OFAC noted that the manufacturer “acted with reckless disregard for Cuba sanctions program,” and caused “significant harm to…its policy objectives by conducting large-volume and high-value transactions in products made or derived from Cuban-nickel.”

    Enforcement Sanctions OFAC

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  • Insurance Company Resolves Apparent Cuba Sanctions Violations

    Federal Issues

    On May 8, OFAC released enforcement information regarding “apparent violations” of the Cuban Assets Control Regulations by Canadian subsidiaries of a U.S. insurance company. The U.S. company self-reported 3,560 apparent violations that occurred between January 2006, and March 2009, and agreed to remit $279,038 to settle potential civil liability. OFAC stated that over a more than three-year period two Canadian subsidiaries issued or renewed property and casualty insurance policies that insured Cuban risks of a Canadian company, and that one of the subsidiaries maintained a D&O liability insurance policy that insured certain directors and officers of three Cuban joint venture partners of a Canadian corporation. Separately, another subsidiary sold, renewed, or maintained in force individual or annual multi-trip travel insurance policies in which the insured identified Cuba as the travel destination. The civil penalty reflects OFAC’s balancing of aggravating and mitigating factors, including the actual knowledge of the company and certain members of management of the violative conduct; and the company’s self-disclosure, cooperation, and advance remediation.

    Sanctions OFAC Financial Crimes

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