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  • SBA offers additional deferment for Covid-19 EIDL loans

    Federal Issues

    On March 15, SBA extended the deferment period for the Covid-19 Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program, to provide a total of 30 months deferment from inception on all approved Covid EIDL loans. The extended deferment of principal and interest payments on existing EIDL loans approved in calendar years 2020, 2021, and 2022 is intended to provide additional flexibility for small business owners affected by Covid-19. While borrowers are not required to make payments during the deferment period, interest will continue to accrue on the loans during the deferment. SBA warned that deferments may result in balloon payments and will not stop any established preauthorized debit or recurring payments on a loan. Borrowers will need to contact their SBA servicing center to pause recurring payments during the extended deferment period. Once the deferment period ends, borrowers will be required to make regular principal and interest payments beginning 30 months from the date of the note. 

    Federal Issues SBA Covid-19 EIDL Small Business Lending CARES Act

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  • SBA updates Covid-19 EIDL guidance

    Federal Issues

    On November 19, the Small Business Administration (SBA) announced updated guidance for Covid-19 Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program applicants while funding remains available. The updated guidance provided that (i) the deadline to submit EIDL loans and targeted advance applications will be December 31 (loans will continued to be processed after this date until funds are depleted); (ii) supplemental targeted advance applications will also be accepted through December 31, however SBA noted that it may not be able to process applications submitted near the deadline due to legal requirements (SBA encouraged applicants to apply by December 10 to allow for adequate processing time); (iii) borrowers may request increases “up to their maximum eligible loan amount for up to two years after their loan origination date, or until the funds are exhausted, whichever is soonest”; and (iv) appeal requests for Covid-19 EIDL applications that are received on or before December 31 will be accepted and reviewed provided they are received within the regulation’s timeframes (i.e., “six months from the date of decline for reconsiderations and 30 days from the date of reconsideration decline for appeals—unless funding is no longer available”). SBA further directed applicants to review enhancements made to the EIDL program in September.

    Federal Issues SBA Small Business Lending EIDL Covid-19

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  • SBA announces $5 billion in Covid-19 aid for small businesses

    Federal Issues

    On April 23, the Small Business Administration (SBA) announced a new round of Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) assistance to provide $5 billion in additional assistance to small businesses and nonprofit organizations with 10 employees or fewer that have been severely affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. The Supplemental Targeted Advance program is the latest SBA relief program and follows recent SBA actions taken to increase EIDL assistance. As previously covered by InfoBytes, last month SBA raised the loan limit for Covid-19 disaster loans “from 6-months of economic injury with a maximum loan amount of $150,000 to up to 24-months of economic injury with a maximum loan amount of $500,000,” and extended the deferment period for all disaster loans, including Covid-19 EIDLs, until 2022 (covered by InfoBytes here).

    Federal Issues SBA Covid-19 Small Business Lending EIDL

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  • SBA increases lending limit for Covid-19 EIDL program

    Federal Issues

    On March 24, the Small Business Administration (SBA) announced that the maximum amount small businesses and non-profit organizations can borrow through its Covid-19 Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program will increase beginning the week of April 6. According to the announcement, SBA will raise the loan limit for Covid-19 disaster loans “from 6-months of economic injury with a maximum loan amount of $150,000 to up to 24-months of economic injury with a maximum loan amount of $500,000.” New loan applications, as well as loans-in-process when the increase takes effect “will automatically be considered” for the new maximum loan limit. This change follows SBA’s announcement earlier this month, which extended the deferment period for all disaster loans, including Covid-19 EIDLs, until 2022 (covered by InfoBytes here).

    Federal Issues SBA Covid-19 Small Business Lending EIDL

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  • SBA defers all disaster and EIDL loans until 2022

    Federal Issues

    On March 12, the Small Business Administration (SBA) extended the deferment period for all disaster loans, including the Covid-19 Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program, until 2022. Specifically, the first payment due date for SBA disaster loans made in calendar year 2020 is extended from 12-months to 24-months from the date of the note. SBA disaster loans made in calendar year 2021 will have their first payment due date extended from 12-months to 18-months from the date of the note. SBA notes that existing SBA disaster loans approved before 2020 that were in regular servicing status of March 1, 2020 (and that previously had received an extended initial deferment period through March 31), will automatically be granted an additional 12-month deferment of principal and interest payments. SBA stresses, however, that interest will continue to accrue on outstanding loan balances through the duration of the deferment.

    Federal Issues SBA Covid-19 Small Business Lending CARES Act EIDL

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  • Biden extends Covid-19 regulatory relief

    Federal Issues

    On March 11, President Biden signed the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (the Act), which will, among other things, extend certain emergency authorities and temporary regulatory relief contained in the CARES Act to address the continued impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. Under a section titled, “Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship,” the Act will provide an additional $7.25 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), extend the eligibility of certain nonprofit entities for covered loans under the PPP, and amend certain aspects of the program allowing for certain businesses to take second loans. However, the Act does not actually extend the PPP, which is currently set to expire on March 31 (covered by InfoBytes here). The Act also allocates nearly $10 billion through the Homeowner Assistance Fund to allow eligible entities to provide direct assistance for mortgage payments, property insurance, utilities, and other housing-related costs to help prevent delinquencies, defaults, and foreclosures. Moreover, a provision related to fair housing activities provides $20 million “to ensure fair housing organizations have additional resources to address fair housing inquiries, complaints, investigations, and education and outreach activities, and costs of delivering or adapting services, during or relating to the coronavirus pandemic.” Additionally, the Act provides $15 billion for Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) advance payments, including $5 billion for supplemental targeted EIDL advance payments for the hardest hit.

    In addition to providing Covid-19 relief, the Act also includes, among other things, a section that modifies the treatment of student loan forgiveness. Specifically, Section 9675 will exclude from gross income any amount of student loan debt that is modified or discharged (in whole or in part) after December 31, 2020, and before January 1, 2026. The tax exemption will include federal, private, and institutional loans. According to a press release issued by Senators Bob Menendez (D-NJ) and Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), the provision is intended to “ensur[e] borrowers whose debt is fully or partially forgiven are not saddled with thousands of dollars in surprise taxes.”

    Federal Issues Federal Legislation Covid-19 Biden CARES Act SBA EIDL Student Lending American Rescue Plan Act of 2021

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  • SBA updates PPP processing fee guidance

    Federal Issues

    On February 8, the Small Business Administration (SBA) issued an updated procedural notice addressing changes to the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) processing fees and reporting process. The notice covers the breakdown of fees for first-draw PPP loans made after December 27, 2020 and for second-draw PPP loans. The notice notes that “all processing fees are based on the balance of the PPP loan outstanding at the time of full disbursement of the loan.” The SBA states that lenders may request payment of processing fees after the lender successfully reports that the loan has been fully disbursed by using Form 1502. Moreover, the SBA states that it will remit Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) reconciliation payments from February 9 through February 19. As previously covered by InfoBytes, SBA is no longer deducting EIDL advances from PPP forgiveness payments, and for any forgiveness payments that were already reduced by an EIDL advance, the SBA will automatically remit a reconciliation payment to the PPP lender that will include the advance amount plus interest through the remittance date. 

    Federal Issues Covid-19 SBA EIDL

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  • SBA issues notice detailing remittance of EIDL advances

    Federal Issues

    On January 8, the Small Business Administration (SBA) issued a procedural notice discussing the repeal of Section 1110(e)(6) of the CARES Act, which required the SBA to deduct the amount of any Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) advance received by a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) borrower from the PPP forgiveness payment from the SBA to the PPP lender. According to the notice, effective immediately, the SBA will no longer deduct EIDL advances from PPP forgiveness payments and will apply this change to any SBA forgiveness payments that were confirmed by December 29, 2020 or later.

    Additionally, for any forgiveness payments that were already reduced by an EIDL advance, the SBA will automatically remit a reconciliation payment to the PPP lender that will include the advance amount, plus interest through the remittance date. The SBA notes that the PPP lender does not need to request the reconciliation payment, but must notify the borrower of the payment, re-amortize the loan, and notify the borrower of the next payment amount or whether the loan has been paid in full.

    Federal Issues Covid-19 SBA EIDL CARES Act

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