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  • OFAC sanctions Houthi military commander

    Financial Crimes

    On November 18, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order 13611 against a key military official connected to the seizure of property in Yemen, who used a variety of unlawful tactics including extortion. According to OFAC, the sanctioned individual was the commander of the Houthi-controlled military logistics support organization, where he assisted the Houthis in acquiring smuggled weapons, and served as the officer responsible for managing assets and funds controlled by the Houthis. As a result of the sanctions, all property and interests in property belonging to the sanctioned individual, and “any entities that are owned, directly or indirectly, 50 percent or more” by the individual that are subject to U.S. jurisdiction are blocked and must be reported to OFAC. OFAC’s announcement further noted that OFAC regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with designated persons unless exempt or otherwise authorized by a general or specific license and warned foreign financial institutions that if they knowingly facilitate significant transactions for any of the designated persons, they may be subject to U.S. correspondent account or payable-through account sanctions.

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Of Interest to Non-US Persons OFAC Designations Yemen SDN List

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  • OFAC sanctions network connected to Iran, Houthis in Yemen

    Financial Crimes

    On June 10, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order 13224 against members of a smuggling organization that allegedly contributes to funding Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force (IRGC-QF) and the Houthis in Yemen. According to OFAC, the group is led by an Iran-based Houthi financier and generates millions of dollars from selling commodities, such as Iranian petroleum, of which a significant amount is directed through an intricate network of intermediaries in several countries to the Houthis in Yemen. OFAC Director Andrea M. Gacki noted that financial support from the network “enables the Houthis’ deplorable attacks threatening civilian and critical infrastructure in Yemen and Saudi Arabia,” and that the attacks “undermine efforts to bring the conflict to an end and, most tragically, starve tens of millions of innocent civilians.” As a result of the sanctions, all property and interests in property belonging to the sanctioned individuals, and “any entities that are owned, directly or indirectly, 50 percent or more” by the individuals that are subject to U.S. jurisdiction are blocked and must be reported to OFAC. OFAC’s announcement further noted that OFAC regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with designated persons and foreign financial institutions that knowingly participate in significant transactions related to the designated individuals risk sanctions that could discontinue their access to the U.S. financial system or block their property or interests in property under U.S. jurisdiction.

    In addition, OFAC announced the removal of sanctions on three former Government of Iran officials, and two companies who were previously connected to the handlings of Iranian petrochemical products. According to OFAC, “these delistings are a result of a verified change in behavior or status on the part of the sanctioned parties and demonstrate the U.S. government’s commitment to lifting sanctions in the event of a change in behavior or status for sanctioned persons.”

    Financial Crimes OFAC Sanctions Of Interest to Non-US Persons Department of Treasury Sudan SDN List Yemen

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  • OFAC sanctions Houthi military official

    Financial Crimes

    On May 21, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order 13611 against a key senior military official connected to the Ansarallah, sometimes referred to as the Houthis, for allegedly arranging attacks impacting Yemeni civilians. According to OFAC, the sanctioned individual recently led the offense against Yemeni government-held territory in the Marib province, which “puts approximately one million already vulnerable internally displaced people (IDP) at risk, threatens to overwhelm an already stretched humanitarian response, and is triggering broader escalation.” As a result of the sanctions, all property and interests in property belonging to the sanctioned individual, and “any entities that are owned, directly or indirectly, 50 percent or more” by the individual that are subject to U.S. jurisdiction are blocked and must be reported to OFAC. OFAC’s announcement further noted that OFAC regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with designated persons unless exempt or otherwise authorized by a general or specific license, and warned foreign financial institutions that if they knowingly facilitate significant transactions for any of the designated persons, they may be subject to U.S. correspondent account or payable-through account sanctions.

    Financial Crimes Burma OFAC Department of Treasury Sanctions OFAC Designations Of Interest to Non-US Persons Yemen SDN List

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  • OFAC sanctions key Yemeni military leaders

    Financial Crimes

    On March 2, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions against two individuals associated with the Ansarallah militia. The sanctions are taken pursuant to Executive Order 13611, which authorizes “blocking property of persons threatening the peace, security, or stability of Yemen.” As a result of the sanctions, all of the property and interests in property of the designated individuals that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons, as well as any entities that are owned 50 percent or more by the designated individuals, are blocked and must be reported to OFAC. Additionally, OFAC regulations prohibit U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated individuals unless exempt or otherwise authorized by an OFAC general or specific license. OFAC specifies that the “prohibitions include the making of any contribution or provision of funds, goods, or services by, to, or for the benefit of any blocked person or the receipt of any contribution or provision of funds, goods, or services from any such person.”

    Financial Crimes OFAC Department of Treasury Sanctions Of Interest to Non-US Persons OFAC Designations SDN List Yemen

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  • OFAC revokes Yemen-related general licenses and designations

    Financial Crimes

    On February 16, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) revoked and archived five counter terrorism-related general licenses (GL) related to the Ansarallah designations after the U.S. Department of State determined that Ansarallah would “no longer be[] blocked pursuant to the Global Terrorism Sanctions Regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 594, the Foreign Terrorist Organizations Sanctions Regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 597, or Executive Order 13224, as amended.” Specifically, OFAC revoked GL 9, “Official Business of the United States Government,” GL 10, “Official Activities of Certain International Organizations,” GL 11, “Certain Transactions in Support of Nongovernmental Organizations’ Activities in Yemen,” GL 12, “Transactions Related to the Exportation or Reexportation of Agricultural Commodities, Medicine, Medical Devices, Replacement Parts and Components or Software Updates,” and GL 13,“Authorizing Transactions Involving Ansarallah.” Additionally, OFAC removed frequently asked questions 875, 876, and 877 from its website and made deletions to the Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons list.

    Financial Crimes OFAC Yemen OFAC Designations Of Interest to Non-US Persons Department of Treasury Sanctions

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  • OFAC issues counter terrorism general licenses and related FAQs, updates SDN List

    Financial Crimes

    On January 19, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issued four General Licenses in conjunction with State Department designations against a foreign terrorist organization: General License 9, “Official Business of the United States Government,” General License 10, “Official Activities of Certain International Organizations,” General License 11, “Certain Transactions in Support of Nongovernmental Organizations’ Activities in Yemen,” and General License 12, “Transactions Related to the Exportation or Reexportation of Agricultural Commodities, Medicine, Medical Devices, Replacement Parts and Components or Software Updates.” The general licenses authorize certain transactions ordinarily prohibited by the Global Terrorism Sanctions Regulations, Foreign Terrorist Organizations Sanctions Regulations, and Executive Order 13224, including actions “to help facilitate the uninterrupted flow of humanitarian assistance, including COVID-19-related assistance, and certain other critical commodities to the people of Yemen that would otherwise be prohibited pursuant to authorities administered by OFAC.” OFAC also published related FAQs 875, 876, and 877.

    OFAC also updated its Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List to add individuals and entities associated with Venezuela, Russia, and Yemen designations.

    Financial Crimes OFAC Department of Treasury Yemen Russia Venezuela Sanctions Of Interest to Non-US Persons OFAC Designations

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