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  • CFPB shares consumer finance data

    Federal Issues

    On June 15, CFPB Deputy Director Zixta Martinez spoke before the Consumer Federation of America’s 2022 Consumer Assembly addressing recent research by the Bureau on payday loans, rent-a-bank schemes, overdraft and other banking fees, medical debt, and credit reporting. In her remarks, Martinez first discussed the Bureau’s report on consumer use of state payday loan extended payment plans, which she noted is “the first significant piece of research into extended payment plans” (covered by InfoBytes here). She assured advocates raising concerns about “rent-a-banks” that the Bureau shares those concerns and is focused on this issue. Turning to overdraft and other banking fees, Martinez described overdraft programs as “more like a maze than a service,” which often result in complicated charges being imposed on families who can least afford them, driving them into deeper debt. She pointed to the Bureau’s desire “to move toward a market that works for families and honest financial institutions alike,” recognizing positive shifts made by big banks towards reducing or eliminating such fees as well as the Bureau’s commitment to “returning vigorous competition to this market." Finally, Martinez addressed medical debt, noting that many of the “approximately 43 million Americans with $88 billion in allegedly unpaid medical bills on their credit reports” are trapped in a “bureaucratic doom-loop comprised of the healthcare, insurance, debt collection, and credit reporting industries.” To address this issue, Martinez explained that the Bureau is working broadly across the government and with the non-profit sector to ensure that medical debt does not impact job security, housing, or qualification for affordable credit, and is considering whether it is appropriate for such debt to be included on credit reports at all.

    Federal Issues CFPB Consumer Finance Medical Debt Overdraft

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  • Colorado enacts medical debt collection bill

    State Issues

    On June 9, the Colorado governor signed HB 1285, which prohibits hospitals from taking certain debt collection actions against a patient if the hospital is not in compliance with hospital price transparency laws. Specifically, the bill prohibits hospitals that are not in compliance with a price transparency rule that went into effect in January 2021 from placing debts with third-party collection agencies, filing lawsuits to collect on unpaid debts, and reporting debts to credit reporting agencies. The bill also establishes that a patient may file suit if they believe that a hospital was not in material compliance with price transparency laws.

    State Issues State Legislation Colorado Medical Debt Debt Collection Consumer Finance

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  • CFPB releases medical debt report

    Federal Issues

    On April 20, the CFPB released a report analyzing complaints submitted to the Bureau in 2021 regarding medical billing, collection, and consumer reporting practices. The report describes the difficulties that consumers face in identifying, verifying, or eliminating the debt. The report also noted that most of the complaints could be sorted into two main themes: (1) the debt was already paid, does not belong to the consumer in question, or is otherwise incorrect, and (2) that information included in collection notices raised concerns. According to the Bureau, key findings of the report include, among other things: (i) from 2018 to 2021, complaints regarding collection attempts on medical bills that were not owed increased by 31 percent; (ii) approximately 15 percent of debt collection complaints in 2021 were about attempts to collect a medical bill; and (iii) “consumers often expressed surprise and frustration about finding out about old or small medical debts when checking their credit report.” The report is the most recent among statements and reports from the CFPB regarding medical debts and credit reporting. As previously covered by InfoBytes, in March the CFPB released a report, Medical Debt Burden in the United States, that cited research finding that $88 billion in medical debt on consumer credit reports, accounting for 58 percent of all uncollected debt tradelines reported to credit reporting agencies.

    Federal Issues CFPB Consumer Finance Medical Debt Debt Collection Consumer Complaints

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  • Biden orders agency action on medical debt

    Federal Issues

    On April 11, the Biden administration released a Fact Sheet regarding an initiative to decrease “malicious” and “predatory” billing and collection practices related to medical debts, including holding medical providers and debt collectors “accountable for harmful practices.” According to the Fact Sheet, the administration has ordered several agencies to take actions intended to “lessen the burden of medical debt and increase consumer protection.” The Fact Sheet provides “guidance to all agencies to eliminate medical debt as a factor for underwriting in credit programs,” and states, among other things, that the: (i) FHFA is reviewing the credit models that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac use; (ii) USDA is discontinuing “the inclusion of any recurring medical debts into borrower repayment calculations”; and (iii) VA is reviewing its underwriting guidelines to ensure it minimizes or eliminates medical debt reporting as a proxy for creditworthiness. Additionally, the Fact Sheet noted that the Department of Health and Human Services is requesting data from over 2,000 providers on medical bill collection practices, lawsuits against patients, financial assistance, financial product offerings, and third party contracting or debt buying practices. The Fact Sheet also noted that the CFPB “will investigate credit reporting companies and debt collectors” in regard to “patients’ and families’ rights,” which includes targeting “coercive credit reporting” and determining whether medical debts should be included in consumer credit reports.

    Federal Issues Biden Consumer Finance Medical Debt FHFA Freddie Mac Fannie Mae USDA Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Health and Human Services

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  • Chopra says credit reporting on medical debt needs review

    Federal Issues

    On April 6, CFPB Director Rohit Chopra expressed cautious optimism about medical debt credit reporting changes during remarks to the CFPB’s Consumer Advisory Board. The Bureau has studied the burden of medical debt on consumers since the agency’s inception and has issued reports examining the impact of including data related to unpaid medical bills on credit reports. Chopra noted that a report released by the Bureau last month (covered by InfoBytes here) found that $88 billion of outstanding medical bills in collections affect one in every five consumers, with medical debt accounting for 58 percent of all uncollected debt tradelines reported to credit reporting agencies (CRAs). Shortly after the Bureau released the report, the three major CRAs announced they planned to eliminate nearly 70 percent of medical collection debt tradelines from consumer credit reports. As previously covered by InfoBytes, beginning July 1, paid medical collection debt will no longer be included on consumer credit reports issued by those three companies, and unpaid medical bills will only be reported if they remain unpaid for at least 12 months. Additionally, starting in 2023, medical collection debt under $500 will no longer be included on credit reports issued by these CRAs.

    In response to the announcement from the CRAs, Chopra cautioned that “[i]mportant decisions about credit reporting should not be left up to three firms that arbitrarily decide how reporting will impact consumers’ access to credit.” While he acknowledged the importance of providing more time for providers and insurance companies to process claims before debts are reported, he stated that the announcement failed to “fundamentally address the concern that the credit reporting system can be used as a tool to coerce patients into paying bills they may not even owe.” Chopra presented three questions to the Consumer Advisory Board for consideration: (i) should unpaid medical bills be treated as a typical “debt”? (ii) if medical bills are not a good factor in predicting repayment on future loan obligations, should they be included in credit reports? and (iii) how should the inclusion of allegedly unpaid medical bills in credit reports be reviewed as part of the broader question of how data is used in consumer finance markets?

    Federal Issues CFPB Medical Debt Consumer Finance Credit Report Credit Repair Organizations Act

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  • Senate Banking Committee members ask CFPB to address medical debt

    Federal Issues

    On March 29, several Democratic U.S. senators sent a letter to CFPB Director Rohit Chopra asking the Bureau to use its authority to take measures to address the growing medical debt burden facing consumers. The letter, led by Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH), follows a report issued by the Bureau earlier in the month that outlined the negative consequences of medical debt and announced the agency’s intention to review whether data on unpaid medical bills should be included in consumer credit reports (covered by InfoBytes here). The Bureau also stated it would hold consumer reporting agencies accountable for inaccurate reports. Shortly after the Bureau released the report, the three major credit bureaus announced they were eliminating nearly 70 percent of medical collection debt tradelines from consumer credit reports. As previously covered by InfoBytes, Brown issued a statement supporting the credit bureaus’ announcement, but also stressed his intention to collaborate with the Bureau on “address[ing] the growing burden of medical debt, protect[ing] working families, and hold[ing] bad actors accountable.”

    In their letter, the senators highlighted the disproportionate impact of medical debt on low-income individuals, minorities, veterans, younger and older Americans, and other vulnerable populations. The senators also expressed concerns regarding the recent trend of private equity firms investing in the healthcare market, especially as private equity-owned health providers are reportedly charging higher rates but delivering lower quality care. According to the senators, these concerns heighten the need for the Bureau to take further action. The senators asked the Bureau to create an ombudsman position to handle medical debt issues (similar to the ombudsman position that oversees student loan servicers’ compliance with federal and state law), and pressed the need for additional research focusing on, among other things, medical debt collection practices and the debt selling market for medical bills.

    Federal Issues CFPB Senate Banking Committee Consumer Finance Medical Debt

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  • Credit bureaus to eliminate 70% of medical debt tradelines

    Federal Issues

    On March 18, three major credit bureaus released a statement announcing that they are eliminating nearly 70 percent of medical collection debt tradelines from consumer credit reports. According to the statement, beginning July 1, “paid medical collection debt will no longer be included on consumer credit reports. In addition, the time period before unpaid medical collection debt would appear on a consumer’s report will be increased from 6 months to one year, giving consumers more time to work with insurance and/or healthcare providers to address their debt before it is reported on their credit file.” Finally, starting in 2023, medical collection debt under $500 will no longer be included on credit reports issued by the three credit bureaus.  The statement noted that the decision to remove medical tradelines from credit reports was taken “after months of industry research.”

    The same day Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, issued a statement supporting the credit bureaus’ announcement regarding medical debt. Brown noted the changes followed a CFPB announcement that it would hold consumer reporting agencies accountable for inaccurate reports (covered by InfoBytes here). Brown expressed his view that the CFPB is taking “real action for consumers” and noted he intends to collaborate with the CFPB to “address the growing burden of medical debt, protect working families, and hold bad actors accountable.”

    Earlier on March 16, the CFPB a released a data spotlight regarding senior adults (those age 65 and older) and medical debt. The survey used information from the 2018 “FINRA Foundation National Financial Capability Study,” which was administered online to a sample of 27,091 adults ages 18 and older. In total, there were 5,166 respondents ages 65 and older. The study found that 8.5 percent of adults over 65 carried medical debt. The Bureau suggested this outcome “is likely the result of older Americans having the highest health insurance coverage rates of all age groups due to their eligibility for coverage through Medicare,” but referenced Medicare coverage as “limited.” The data spotlight also pointed out that, “[m]edical debt is more common among older people of color, older adults with incomes near the poverty line, people who are uninsured, who are currently unmarried, and who don’t own a home,” specifically noting that “[n]on-White older adults and older adults who are not married more often report medical debt than their counterpart.” The Bureau observed that 76 percent of seniors with medical debt are retired, while 17 percent are still employed and nearly 7 percent are disabled, sick, or unable to work. The Bureau noted that a recent job loss, declining health, or the onset of a disability may explain this data. The survey also found that older adults who had medical debt were significantly more likely to report significant cost-related health care challenges and hardships than others in the same age group without medical debt. More than 33.8 percent of older adults with medical debt have skipped medical treatment or a doctor’s visit due to cost, but just 6 percent of seniors without medical debt skipped medical treatment or a doctor’s visit due to cost, according to the survey data.

    Federal Issues CFPB Medical Debt Consumer Finance Credit Report Credit Reporting Agency

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  • Biden to streamline medical debt forgiveness for veterans

    Federal Issues

    On March 1, President Biden announced that veterans will be able to apply for medical debt forgiveness under a new streamlined process in 90 to 120 days. According to the White House press release, the current process for veterans who are entitled to medical debt forgiveness is complicated, confusing, and time consuming, and may deter veterans from applying for relief. To streamline the medical debt forgiveness request process, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will provide an online option for veterans and set a simple income threshold for receiving relief. The announcement follows a final rule issued by the VA last month, which amended its regulations around the conditions by which VA benefits debts or medical debts are reported to consumer reporting agencies (CRAs), and created a methodology for determining a minimum threshold for debts reported to the CRAs. (Covered by InfoBytes here.)

    Federal Issues Biden Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Debt Consumer Finance

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  • CFPB looks at removing medical debt from credit reports

    Federal Issues

    On March 1, the CFPB announced plans to review whether data on unpaid medical bills should be included in consumer credit reports. The Bureau stated in its report, Medical Debt Burden in the United States, that research found $88 billion in medical debt on consumer credit reports, accounting for 58 percent of all uncollected debt tradelines reported to credit reporting agencies (CRAs). “Our credit reporting system is too often used as a tool to coerce and extort patients into paying medical bills they may not even owe,” CFPB Director Rohit Chopra said in a statement.

    The Bureau noted that medical debt is often less transparent than other types of debt, due to opaque pricing, complicated insurance, charity care coverage, and pricing rules, reporting that in many instances, consumers may not even sign a billing agreement until after receiving treatment. Medical debts often end up in collections, the Bureau added, which can cause far-ranging repercussions even if the bill itself is inaccurate or erroneous. The report noted additional challenges for uninsured consumers, as well as for Black and Latino families, consumers with low incomes, veterans, older adults, and young adults of all races and ethnicities. The report further stated that the Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated the situation, with costs and medical debt expected to increase post-pandemic, and found that medical debt weakens underwriting accuracy, as it is less predictive of future repayment than reporting on traditional credit obligations. The Bureau pointed out that it has seen dramatic effects when newer credit scoring models weigh medical collections tradelines less heavily, but noted that there has been very little adoption of this approach so far.

    The Bureau stated it intends to examine CRAs to ensure they are collecting accurate information from medical debt collectors and expects CRAs to take action against furnishers who routinely report inaccurate information, including cutting off their access to the system. The Bureau also plans to work with the Department of Health and Human Services to make sure consumers are not forced to pay more than the amount due for medical debt. A January compliance bulletin reminded debt collectors and CRAs of their legal obligations under the FDCPA and the FCRA when collecting, furnishing information about, and reporting medical debts covered by the No Surprises Act. The Bureau also recently supported changes by the Department of Veterans Affairs to amend its regulations related to the conditions by which VA benefit debts or medical debts are reported to CRAs. (Covered by InfoBytes here and here.)

    Federal Issues CFPB Consumer Finance Medical Debt Credit Reporting Agency Covid-19 FDCPA FCRA Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Health and Human Services Debt Collection

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