Skip to main content
Menu Icon Menu Icon
Close

InfoBytes Blog

Financial Services Law Insights and Observations

Filter

Subscribe to our InfoBytes Blog weekly newsletter and other publications for news affecting the financial services industry.

  • CFPB Unveils Web-based Tool To Deliver Regular Updates on Consumer Lending Markets

    Federal Issues

    On December 19, the CFPB announced the release of “Consumer Credit Trends,” a beta version of its new web-based tool to help the public monitor developments in the mortgage, credit card, auto loan, and student loan markets. According to the Bureau, the data used by Consumer Credit Trends “draws from a nationally representative sample of credit records maintained by one of the top three U.S. credit repositories.” The CFPB plans to update this information regularly, and will offer analyses on notable findings as warranted. It also clarifies that “before being provided to the Bureau,” the credit records are “stripped of any information that might reveal consumers’ identities, such as names, addresses, and Social Security numbers.” The ability to “chart the state of consumer markets,” says CFPB Director Richard Cordray, “will help us identify and act on trends that warn of another crisis or that show credit is too constricted.”

    Federal Issues Mortgages Consumer Finance Credit Cards CFPB Auto Finance Student Lending Payments

    Share page with AddThis
  • Fed Finalizes Debt-Minimum Rule to Help Banking System Weather Shocks

    Federal Issues

    On December 15, the Fed finalized a rule requiring the biggest global banks to guard against potential collapse by holding minimum amounts of long-term debt and regulatory capital. The rule applies to bank holding companies, U.S. global systemically important banks (GSIB), as well as U.S. branches of foreign banks, and aims to shift the costs of bank failure to shareholders rather than taxpayers by requiring lenders to maintain sufficient amounts of long-term debt, which can be converted to equity to keep a failing bank’s key operations afloat. Specifically, the measure will establish minimum required levels for long-term debt and total loss-absorbing capacity, as well as restrictions on certain short-term debt financing arrangements by parents of GSIB-designated financial institutions. In prepared opening remarks, Fed Chair Janet Yellen explained that “[t]he rule is guided by common sense principles: bank shareholders and debt investors should place their own money at risk so depositors and taxpayers are well protected, and the biggest banks must bear the costs that come with their size.”

    In a memorandum to the Board of Governors, the Fed’s staff noted that covered banks are currently about $70 billion short altogether of the new requirements. The Fed staff estimated that the aggregate increased funding of approximately $680 million to $2 billion annually would be required to make up the shortfall.

    Federal Issues Banking International Shareholders GSIBs Bank Holding Companies

    Share page with AddThis
  • CFPB Orders Credit Services Provider to Pay $200K Civil Penalty for Improper Contract Disclosures

    Federal Issues

    On December 19, the CFPB entered a consent order against a Virginia-based credit services provider assessing a $200,000 penalty and other remediation for making loans with improper disclosures. It was the CFPB’s second enforcement action against the company, as the Bureau had previously taken action against the company, requiring it, among other things, to revise its contract disclosures back in 2014. Under the terms of the consent order released this week, the company must hire an independent consultant with specialized experience in consumer-finance compliance to conduct an independent review of the company’s issuance and servicing of credit, and report to the CFPB a compliance plan based on the findings of such review. The Bureau also assessed a $200,000 civil monetary penalty.

    Federal Issues Consumer Finance CFPB

    Share page with AddThis
  • Prudential Regulators Issue Guidance on New Accounting Standards Governing Credit Loss Allowances

    Federal Issues

    On December 19, the Prudential Regulators have issued guidance in the form of a cover letter (OCC 2016-45; SR 16-19; FIL-79-2016) and FAQs to assist financial institutions and bank examiners interpret and apply new accounting standards applicable to estimated allowances for credit losses. Though applicable to all financial institutions, regardless of size, there are different effective dates for the new standard depending on the institutions status as a public entity and/or SEC filer. The above-referenced FAQs summarize key elements of the new accounting standard, such as effective dates, scope, and transition, while also highlighting the specific GAAP accounting provisions affected by the new standard, including: (i) purchased credit-deteriorated financial assets; (ii) held-to-maturity debt securities; (iii) available-for-sale debt securities; (iv) troubled debt restructuring; and (v) off-balance-sheet credit exposures. The guidance also outlines steps regulators have encourage financial institutions to take to prepare for the transition to the new accounting standard, including: (i) initial supervisory views on measurement methods, (ii) the use of vendors, (iii) scalability, (iv) data needs, and (v) allowance processes.

    Federal Issues Banking Securities SEC Prudential Regulators

    Share page with AddThis
  • New FHFA Rule Requires Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to Submit Underserved Markets Plan

    Federal Issues

    FHFA published a final rule in the December 18 Federal Register implementing certain “Duty to Serve” provisions of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act of 1992, as amended by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008. Among other things, these provisions require that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac adopt formal plans to improve the availability of mortgage financing in a “safe and sound manner” for residential properties that serve “very low-, low-, and moderate-income families” in three specified underserved markets: manufactured housing, affordable housing preservation, and rural markets. FHFA’s new rule addresses this obligation by requiring both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to submit to FHFA a three-year “Underserved Markets Plan” that describes the activities and objectives they will undertake to meet their Duty to Serve requirements. The Plans will become effective January 2018, after which time, the new rule requires further that FHFA annually evaluate, rate, and report to Congress each Enterprise's compliance with its Duty to Serve obligations as required by the statute.

    Federal Issues Mortgages Freddie Mac Fannie Mae FHFA Federal Register

    Share page with AddThis
  • Obama Signs Into Law SEC Small Business Advocate Act

    Federal Issues

    On December 16, President Obama signed into law H.R. 3784, the SEC Small Business Advocate Act of 2016. The legislation, which had broad bipartisan support in the House and Senate, establishes (within the SEC) an Office of the Advocate for Small Business Capital Formation and a Small Business Capital Formation Advisory Committee. Both the Office of the Advocate and the Advisory Committee will be tasked with the dual role of helping small businesses navigate the securities laws and advocate against the application of overly burdensome regulations to small businesses. The small-business advocate is modeled after the SEC’s office of the investor advocate, which was created under the Dodd-Frank Act as a voice for investors.

    Federal Issues Securities Dodd-Frank SEC Obama

    Share page with AddThis
  • Israeli Multinational Pharmaceutical Company Settles FCPA Violations with SEC and DOJ for $519 Million

    Federal Issues

    On December 22, an Israeli multinational pharmaceutical company announced an agreement with the SEC and DOJ to resolve FCPA violations stemming from conduct in Ukraine, Mexico, and Russia, with a $519 million settlement and a deferred prosecution agreement. The company will pay more than $236 million in disgorgement and interest to the SEC, the second largest FCPA-related corporate disgorgement to date. As part of its agreement with the DOJ, the company will pay a $283 million criminal fine and enter into a three-year deferred prosecution agreement under the supervision of an independent compliance monitor.

    Prior Scorecard coverage of the company's investigation can be found here.

    Federal Issues FCPA International SEC DOJ

    Share page with AddThis
  • Brazilian Construction Company and Petrochemical Company Reach $3.5 Billion Global FCPA Settlement

    Federal Issues

    On December 21, a Brazilian construction company and its petrochemical affiliate, reached a $3.5 billion combined global settlement with U.S., Brazilian, and Swiss authorities to resolve FCPA allegations, in which both companies agreed to plead guilty in the U.S. to conspiracy to violate the FCPA. The DOJ alleged that the companies operated an extremely broad and profitable global bribery scheme, including creating an internal bribery department to systematically pay hundreds of millions of dollars to corrupt government officials around the world from 2001 to 2016. The companies attempted to conceal the bribes by disguising the source and disbursement of bribe payments by passing funds through a series of shell companies and by using off-shore bank accounts. While the scheme in large part involved bribes paid to a Brazilian multinational company and Brazilian officials, it also included government officials in numerous other South and Central American countries, and in Africa.

    The construction company agreed to an overall criminal fine of $4.5 billion, but based on its representation of its ability to pay, may end up paying only $2.6 billion. Ten percent of the criminal fine was earmarked for the U.S., with the remainder to Brazil (80%) and Switzerland (10%). The DOJ faulted the construction company for failing to voluntarily disclose the conduct, but granted full cooperation credit based on Odebrecht’s actions once it started to deal with the government. As part of its own related resolution, the petrochemical company agreed to pay over $632 million in criminal fines, with the vast majority ($443 million) going to Brazil, and 15%, or $94.8 million, to each of the DOJ and Switzerland. The petrochemical company also agreed to disgorge $325 million, with $65 million going to the SEC and the rest to Brazil. The DOJ noted the petrochemical company’s failure to voluntarily disclose the conduct, and granted only partial cooperation credit due to the petrochemical company’s failure to turn over any evidence from its internal investigation until seven months after it first talked to the DOJ. Both the construction company and the petrochemical company agreed to engage independent compliance monitors for at least three years

    The resolution is, by far, the largest FCPA resolution ever, with the bulk of the money going to Brazil in apparent recognition of the heavy lifting done by Brazilian prosecutors.

    Prior Scorecard coverage of the ongoing Brazilian multinational company investigations can be found here.

    Federal Issues FCPA International SEC DOJ

    Share page with AddThis
  • FinCEN Penalizes New York Credit Union for Failure to Manage High-Risk International Financial Activity

    Federal Issues

    On December 14, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) announced that it had assessed a $500,000 civil money penalty against a federally-chartered, low-income designated, community development credit union, for “significant violations” of anti-money laundering regulations. According to FinCEN, the credit union had historically maintained an AML program designed to address risks stemming from its designated field of membership in New York, NY. However, in 2011, the credit union began providing banking services to many wholesale, commercial money services business, some of which were located in high risk jurisdictions or engaged in high risk activities, without taking steps to update its AML program. As a result, the credit union was unable to detect and report suspicious activity and was left particularly vulnerable to money laundering.

    Federal Issues Criminal Enforcement International Anti-Money Laundering FinCEN Credit Union

    Share page with AddThis
  • OFAC Clarifies Iran Sanctions Snapback, Also Amends General License Regarding Foreign Flights to Iran

    Federal Issues

    On December 15, OFAC updated the Frequently Asked Questions Relating to the Lifting of Certain U.S. Sanctions Under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, clarifying two FAQs regarding the re-imposition of sanctions in the event of a “sanctions snapback.” Among other things, the revised guidance clarified that the U.S. will not retroactively impose sanctions for activity considered legitimate during the time of the transaction, but that activity would have to immediately halt because the agreement does not grandfather existing contracts. In addition, OFAC explained that the U.S. would provide non-Iranian foreigners a 180-day period to wind down operations that were authorized prior to a snapback. The FAQ-guidance also explained that if a snapback of sanctions were to result in the revocation of licenses, the U.S. government would provide a 180-day wind-down period for those deals, and non-Iranian foreigners could receive repayment from Iranians for goods and services provided prior to a snapback under the terms of an existing contract.

    Separately, OFAC issued amended license General License J-1, regarding foreign flights to Iran, to also authorize flights that involve code-sharing agreements. A code-share is a marketing arrangement in which an airline places its designator code on a flight operated by another airline, and sells tickets for that flight. GL J-1 is effective as of December 15 and replaces and supersedes General License J in its entirety.

    Federal Issues International Sanctions OFAC

    Share page with AddThis

Pages

Upcoming Events