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  • CFPB enhances advisory committees

    Federal Issues

    On March 21, the CFPB announced the Bureau’s advisory committee programs will be enhanced as a result of Director Kraninger’s engagement with current and former committee members during her three-month listening tour. Effective 2020, the committees—Consumer Advisory Board (CAB), Community Bank Advisory Council (CBAC), and Credit Union Advisory Council (CUAC)—will expand their focus to “broad policy matters” and will meet in-person three times a year, instead of two. Additionally, the Academic Research Council (ARC) will be a “Director-level” advisory committee and will meet separately, in-person and twice a year. Memberships to all committees will now be two-year terms, and the terms will be staggered. The Bureau is now accepting applications for 2020 committee membership. Applications must be submitted within 45 days of the notice being published in the Federal Register.

    Federal Issues CFPB Advisory Committee Federal Register

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  • CFPB seeks comments on PACE financing

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On March 4, the CFPB issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) on Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing, which often takes the form of loans to facilitate residential solar energy and other home improvement projects. The ANPR was issued in response to Section 307 of the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act, which amended TILA to mandate the CFPB propose regulations related to PACE financing. Specifically, the regulations are required to carry out the purposes of TILA’s ability-to-repay requirements and apply TILA’s general civil liability provisions for violations, accounting for the “unique nature” of the transaction. In addition to seeking feedback on the unique features of PACE financing and the general implications of regulating PACE financing under TILA, the ANPR also requests commenters (i) provide samples of any written materials used in PACE financing transactions; (ii) describe the current standards and practices in PACE financing origination, including application information obtained and underwriting standards used; and (iii) identify parties in a PACE financing transaction to whom civil liabilities may apply, including information related to any rescission rights and loss mitigation programs available upon borrower default. Comments must be submitted within 60 days after publication in the Federal Register.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance CFPB PACE Programs ANPR Federal Register TILA EGRRCPA

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  • CFPB proposes to rescind ability-to-repay standards in payday rule

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On February 6, the CFPB released two notices of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) related to certain payday lending requirements under the agency’s 2017 final rule covering “Payday, Vehicle Title, and Certain High-Cost Installment Loans” (the Rule). As previously covered by InfoBytes, last October the Bureau announced plans to reconsider the Rule’s mandatory underwriting requirements and address the Rule’s compliance date.

    The first NPRM proposed will rescind certain provisions of the Rule related to underwriting standards for payday loans and related products scheduled to take effect later this year. Specifically, the CFPB proposes to rescind the portion of the Rule that would make it an unfair and abusive practice for a lender to make covered high-interest rate, short-term loans or covered longer-term balloon payment loans without reasonably determining that the consumer has the ability to repay. The proposed changes would also rescind prescribed mandatory underwriting requirements for making the ability-to-repay determination, provisions exempting certain loans from the mandatory underwriting requirements, as well as related definitions, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements. The CFPB explains that it now initially determines that the evidence underlying the identification of the unfair and abusive practice in the Rule “is not sufficiently robust and reliable to support that determination, in light of the impact those provisions will have on the market for covered short-term and longer-term balloon-payment loans, and the ability of consumers to obtain such loans, among other things.” If finalized, the proposals represent a significant change to the Rule as finalized during the tenure of former Bureau Director Richard Cordray in October 2017. (See Buckley Special Alert for more detailed coverage on the Rule.) Comments will be accepted for 90 days following publication in the Federal Register.

    The second NPRM seeks to delay the Rule’s compliance date for mandatory underwriting provisions from August 19, 2019 to August 19, 2020. Notably, the Bureau states in a press release announcing the NPRMs that the proposal to delay the effective date does not extend to the Rule’s provisions governing payments, which “prohibit payday and certain other lenders from making a new attempt to withdraw funds from an account where two consecutive attempts have failed unless consumers consent to further withdrawals.” Lenders also will still be required to provide written notice to consumers both before the first attempt to withdraw payment from their accounts, as well as prior to subsequent attempts involving different dates, amounts, or payment channels. These provisions are not under reconsideration and will take effect August 19, 2019. Comments will be accepted for 30 days following publication in the Federal Register.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance CFPB Payday Lending Underwriting Federal Register Ability To Repay Payday Rule

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  • Federal Reserve issues final rules reflecting credit and interest rate increases

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On January 31, the Federal Reserve Board (Fed) published a final rule amending Regulation A (Extensions of Credit by Federal Reserve Banks) to reflect its December 19 approval of a one-quarter percent increase, from 2.75 percent to 3 percent. Additionally, because the formula for the secondary credit rate incorporates the primary rate, the secondary credit rate also increased by one-quarter percentage point, from 3.25 percent to 3.5 percent. The rate changes took effect on January 31, but were applicable on December 20, 2018.

    The same day, the Fed also issued a final rule amending Regulation D (Reserve Requirements of Depository Institutions) to reflect approval of a 0.20 percentage point increase to the “rate of interest paid on balances maintained to satisfy reserve balance requirements (“IORR”) and the rate of interest paid on excess balances (“IOER”), both now at 2.4 percent, maintained at Federal Reserve Banks by or on behalf of eligible institutions.” The rate changes took effect on January 31, but were applicable on December 20.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Federal Reserve Regulation A Regulation D Federal Register

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  • CFPB seeks information on debt collection disclosures

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On February 4, the CFPB released a request for public comment on a new information collection titled, “Debt Collection Quantitative Disclosure Testing.” The proposed collection—which seeks Office of Management and Budget approval to conduct a web survey as part of the Bureau's debt collection disclosure research—“will explore consumer comprehension and decision making in response to debt collection disclosure forms.” Comments must be received by March 6.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance CFPB Debt Collection Disclosures OMB Federal Register

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  • Agencies increase threshold for appraisal exemption under TILA for HPMLs

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On November 23, the CFPB, OCC, and the Federal Reserve Board published a final rule in the Federal Register, which increases the smaller loan exemption threshold for the special appraisal requirements for higher-priced mortgage loans (HPMLs) under TILA. TILA requires creditors to obtain a written appraisal based on a physical visit to the home’s interior before making a HPML, unless the loan meets or is less than the threshold exemption. Each year the threshold must be readjusted based on the annual percentage increase in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers. The exemption threshold for 2019 is $26,700, up from $26,000. This final rule is effective January 1, 2019.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Mortgages Appraisal OCC Federal Register Federal Reserve CFPB

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  • Agencies propose $400,000 threshold for residential appraisal requirement

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On November 20, the OCC announced a joint notice of proposed rulemaking with the Federal Reserve Board and the FDIC, which raises the threshold for residential real estate transactions requiring an appraisal to $400,000 from its current level of $250,000. According to the OCC, the proposal is in response to feedback that the current exemption threshold has not increased to keep pace with the price appreciation in the residential real estate market. The proposal includes the rural residential appraisal exemption included in the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act (previously covered by InfoBytes here). Additionally, among other things, the proposal implements the Dodd-Frank Act mandate that institutions appropriately review appraisals for compliance with the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice. Comments will be due 60 days after publication in the Federal Register.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance Mortgages Appraisal OCC Federal Register FDIC Federal Reserve EGRRCPA

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  • FDIC seeks comments on small-dollar loans

    Federal Issues

    On November 14, the FDIC issued a request for information (RFI) seeking public comment on ways it can encourage FDIC-supervised financial institutions to offer “responsible, prudently underwritten small-dollar credit products that are economically viable and address the credit needs of bank customers.” In the RFI’s release, FDIC Chairman Jelena McWilliams pointed to studies showing that “[c]onsumers benefit when small-dollar credit products are available from banks” and requested “the public to use the RFI process to tell [the FDIC] how to ensure that consumers can obtain small dollar credit from banking institutions in a responsible manner.” The RFI seeks information related to the “full spectrum of issues” related to banks offering small-dollar credit, including regulatory and non-regulatory obstacles for banks, as well as actions the FDIC could take to assist banks in serving the small-dollar market. In addition to general feedback, the RFI includes a list of suggested topics and questions for commenters to address. Comments will be due 60 days after publication in the Federal Register.

    Recently, the OCC and the CFPB have also made efforts to encourage banks to meet the small-dollar credit needs of consumers. In May, the OCC issued Bulletin 2018-14 encouraging banks to offer responsible short-term, small-dollar installment loans with typical maturities between two and 12 months (covered by InfoBytes here). In addition to applauding the OCC’s Bulletin, the CFPB announced it expects to publish proposed rules reconsidering the ability-to-repay provisions of the rule covering Payday, Vehicle Title, and Certain High-Cost Installment Loans  in January 2019 (covered by InfoBytes here).

    Federal Issues FDIC Small Dollar Lending RFI OCC CFPB Installment Loans Payday Rule Federal Register

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  • Agencies issue joint proposal to streamline small institution reporting requirements

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance

    On November 7, the OCC, FDIC, and Federal Reserve issued a proposal to streamline regulatory reporting for qualifying small institutions to implement Section 205 of the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act. Specifically, the joint proposal would permit depository institutions with less than $5 billion in assets—previously set at $1 billion—that do not engage in certain complex or international activities to file the FFIEC 051 Call Report, the most streamlined version of the Call Reports. Additionally, the proposal would reduce the existing reportable data items in the FFIEC 051 Call Report by approximately 37 percent for the first and third calendar quarters. The proposal also includes similar provisions for uninsured institutions with less than $5 billion in total consolidated assets that are supervised by the Federal Reserve and the OCC. Comments on the proposal must be received within 60 days of publication in the Federal Register.

    Agency Rule-Making & Guidance FDIC Federal Register Federal Reserve OCC Call Report EGRRCPA

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  • FTC proposes rule to implement free credit monitoring for servicemembers

    Federal Issues

    On November 1, the FTC announced a proposed rule, which would implement the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act requirement for nationwide consumer reporting agencies (CRAs) to provide free electronic credit monitoring services for active duty servicemembers. The proposal defines the term “electronic credit monitoring service” as a service through which the CRAs provide, at a minimum, electronic notification of material additions or modifications to a consumer’s file and requires CRAs to notify servicemembers within 24 hours of any material change. The proposal notes that CRAs may require that servicemembers provide contact information, proof of identity, and proof of active duty status in order to use the free service and outlines how a servicemember may prove active duty status, such as with a copy of active duty orders. Additionally, the proposal prohibits CRAs from requiring servicemembers to purchase a product in order to obtain the free service or requiring the servicemember to agree to terms and conditions. Comments will be due 60 days after publication in the Federal Register.

    Federal Issues FTC EGRRCPA Credit Reporting Agency Credit Monitoring Federal Register Servicemembers

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