Skip to main content
Menu Icon Menu Icon
Close

InfoBytes Blog

Financial Services Law Insights and Observations

Filter

Subscribe to our InfoBytes Blog weekly newsletter and other publications for news affecting the financial services industry.

  • OFAC designates Hizballah-associated companies and officials as global terrorists

    Financial Crimes

    On February 26, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) designated three individuals and 12 entities—all based in Lebanon—as Specially Designated Global Terrorists (SDGTs). Pursuant to Executive Order 13224, as amended, OFAC designated two of the individuals as leaders or officials of a Hizballah-related foundation that was previously designated for supporting terrorism in 2007. The entities are also associated with the foundation. One of the entities controlled by the foundation and a number of its subsidiaries reportedly did business with a Lebanon-based bank, which had been designated as an SDGT in August, allowing Hizballah to avoid close examination of its transactions by Lebanese banking authorities.

    OFAC reiterated that “all property and interests in property of these targets that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC. OFAC’s regulations generally prohibit all dealings by U.S. persons or within the United States (including transactions transiting the United States) that involve any property or interests in property of blocked or designated persons. In addition, persons that engage in certain transactions with the individuals and entities designated today may themselves be exposed to sanctions or subject to an enforcement action.”

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Of Interest to Non-US Persons Sanctions Combating the Financing of Terrorism

    Share page with AddThis
  • OFAC designates Lebanon and DRC-based Hizballah money launderers

    Financial Crimes

    On December 13, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order 13224 against two Lebanon- and Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)-based money launderers and their affiliated companies for allegedly generating tens of millions of dollars for Hizballah, its financiers, and their activities. According to OFAC, the sanctions are part of Treasury’s continued prioritization to disrupt “the full range of Hizballah’s illicit financial activity,” which has, to date, designated 80 Hizballah-affiliated persons since 2017. As a result of the sanctions, “all property and interests in property of these targets that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC notes that its regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated persons, and states that persons who engage in certain transaction with the designated individuals and entities “may themselves be exposed to sanctions or subject to an enforcement action.” The designated persons are also subject to secondary sanctions pursuant to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations, which implement the Hizballah International Financing Prevention Act of 2015, and allow OFAC the authority to “prohibit or impose strict conditions on the opening or maintaining in the United States of a correspondent account or a payable-through account by a foreign financial institution that knowingly facilitates a significant transaction for a terrorist group like Hizballah, or a person acting on behalf of or at the direction of, or owned or controlled by, [a Specially Designated Global Terrorist] such as Hizballah.”

    OFAC also issued three new counter terrorism-related FAQs, which provide additional guidance related to the designated persons.

    Financial Crimes OFAC Of Interest to Non-US Persons Sanctions Anti-Money Laundering

    Share page with AddThis
  • OFAC sanctions Iran’s central bank and national development fund

    Financial Crimes

    On September 20, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order 13224 against Iran’s central bank, the country’s national development fund, and an Iran-based company for providing financial support to the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, its Qods Force (IRGC-QF), and Hizballah, the regime’s terrorist proxy. OFAC designated the bank for purportedly providing billions of dollars to these entities, and alleged that the national development fund “has been a major source of foreign currency and funding” for both the IRGC-QF and Iran’s Ministry of Defense and Armed Forces Logistics (MODAFL). Sanctions were brought against the Iran-based company for concealing financial transfers for MODAFL’s military purchases, including those originating from the national development fund. As a result of the sanctions, “all property and interests in property of these entities that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC noted that its regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated persons, and warned foreign financial institutions that if they knowingly facilitate significant transactions for any of the designated entities, they may be subject to U.S. correspondent account or payable-through account sanctions.

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Sanctions Iran Of Interest to Non-US Persons

    Share page with AddThis
  • OFAC sanctions Iranian petroleum shipping network

    Financial Crimes

    On September 4, the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13224 against a complex shipping network “that is directed by and financially supports the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force (IRGC-QF) and its terrorist proxy Hizballah.” According to OFAC, the IRGC-QF managed to obfuscate its involvement in moving hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of Iranian oil over the past year through the use of the sanctioned shipping network for the benefit of illicit actors. The sanctioned shipping network includes 16 entities and 10 individuals, as well as 11 vessels identified as “as property in which blocked persons have an interest.”

    As a result of the sanctions, “all property and interests in property of these entities that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC noted that its regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated persons, and warned foreign financial institutions that if they knowingly facilitate significant financial transactions for any of the designated entities, they may be subject to U.S. correspondent account or payable-through account sanctions. Additionally, OFAC issued a reminder that “the purchase, acquisition, sale, transport, or marketing of petroleum or petroleum products from Iran is sanctionable pursuant to E.O. 13846,” and released a new shipping advisory warning the maritime community of these types of schemes and the sanctions risks associated with blocked persons.

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Of Interest to Non-US Persons Iran Sanctions

    Share page with AddThis
  • OFAC sanctions bank connected to Hizballah; identifies several individuals as facilitators for HAMAS

    Financial Crimes

    On August 29, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order 13224 (E.O. 13224) against a Lebanon-based financial institution, along with three of its subsidiaries, for allegedly facilitating banking activities for Hizballah. OFAC designated the financial institution as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist “for assisting in, sponsoring, or providing financial, material, or technological support for, or financial or other services to or in support of, Hizballah.” As a result of the sanctions, “all property and interests in property of these targets that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC noted that its regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated persons. The designated entities are also subject to secondary sanctions pursuant to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations, which implement the Hizballah International Financing Prevention Act of 2015, and allow OFAC the authority to “prohibit or impose strict conditions on the opening or maintaining in the United States of a correspondent account or a payable-through account by a foreign financial institution that knowingly facilitates a significant transaction for Hizballah, or a person acting on behalf of or at the direction of, or owned or controlled by, Hizballah.”

    The same day, OFAC also designated several financial facilitators pursuant to E.O. 13224 for allegedly acting as intermediaries between Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force and HAMAS’s operational arm. According to OFAC, the Lebanon and Gaza-based financial facilitators are responsible for moving tens of millions of dollars from Iran through Hizballah to HAMAS, funding violence against people in Gaza. As a result, all property and interests in property of the sanctioned targets subject to U.S. jurisdiction are blocked and must be reported to OFAC. U.S. persons are also generally prohibited from entering into transactions with designated persons. Furthermore, “persons that engage in certain transactions with the individuals designated today may themselves be exposed to sanctions or subject to an enforcement action.” 

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Sanctions Of Interest to Non-US Persons Iran

    Share page with AddThis
  • OFAC amends several sanctions regulations

    Financial Crimes

    On July 22, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) released amendments to the Global Terrorism Sanctions Regulations (GTSR); Transnational Criminal Organizations Sanctions Regulations (TCOSR); and portions of the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations (HFSR). Specifically, the GTSR and the TCOSR were amended to implement the Hizballah International Financing Prevention Amendments Act of 2018. The TCOSR was also amended to implement Executive Order 13863. OFAC also announced amendments to the GTSR to implement and reference the Sanctioning the Use of Civilians as Defenseless Shields Act of 2018. Finally, OFAC amended the HFSR to make various technical and conforming changes as well as update certain provisions. The amendments take effect July 23.

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Sanctions Of Interest to Non-US Persons

    Share page with AddThis
  • OFAC sanctions senior member of Hizballah operation

    Financial Crimes

    On July 19, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order 13224 against a senior Hizballah operative allegedly connected to the planning, coordination, and execution of terrorist attacks outside of Lebanon. According to OFAC, the action is part of the Treasury Department’s continued attempts to disrupt “the full range of Hizballah’s illicit financial and facilitation activities.” As a result of the sanctions, “all property and interests in property of this target that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC notes that its regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated person. The designated individual is also subject to secondary sanctions pursuant to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations, which implement the Hizballah International Financing Prevention Act of 2015, and allow OFAC the authority to “prohibit or impose strict conditions on the opening or maintaining in the United States of a correspondent account or a payable-through account by a foreign financial institution that knowingly facilitates a significant transaction for Hizballah, or a person acting on behalf of or at the direction of, or owned or controlled by, Hizballah.”

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Sanctions Of Interest to Non-US Persons

    Share page with AddThis
  • OFAC sanctions Iranian-backed Hizballah officials

    Financial Crimes

    On July 9, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions pursuant to Executive Order 13224 against three Iranian-backed Hizballah political and security figures for “exploit[ing] Lebanon’s financial and security elements” in furtherance of Hizballah’s and Iran’s activities in support of terrorists and acts of terrorism. As a result of the sanctions, “all property and interests in property of these targets that are in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons must be blocked and reported to OFAC.” OFAC notes that its regulations “generally prohibit” U.S. persons from participating in transactions with the designated individuals. The designated individuals are also subject to secondary sanctions pursuant to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations, which implement the Hizballah International Financing Prevention Act of 2015, and allow OFAC the authority to “prohibit or impose strict conditions on the opening or maintaining in the United States of a correspondent account or a payable-through account by a foreign financial institution that knowingly facilitates a significant transaction for Hizballah, or a person acting on behalf of or at the direction of, or owned or controlled by, Hizballah.”

    Financial Crimes Department of Treasury OFAC Sanctions Iran Of Interest to Non-US Persons

    Share page with AddThis
  • OFAC sanctions Hizballah financier conduits

    Financial Crimes

    On April 24, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced sanctions against two individuals and three entities “acting as conduits for sanctions evasion schemes" for Hizballah finances. The designated entities and individuals are also subject to secondary sanctions pursuant to the Hizballah Financial Sanctions Regulations, which implement the Hizballah International Financing Prevention Act of 2015, and allows OFAC the authority to “prohibit or impose strict conditions on the opening or maintaining in the United States of a correspondent account or a payable-through account by a foreign financial institution that knowingly facilitates a significant transaction for Hizballah, or a person acting on behalf of or at the direction of, or owned or controlled by, Hizballah.” As a result, all property and interests in property of the sanctioned individuals and entities, and of any entities owned 50 percent or more by them subject to U.S. jurisdiction, are blocked and must be reported to OFAC. U.S. persons are also generally prohibited from entering into transactions with designated persons. 

    Visit here for additional InfoBytes coverage on sanctions involving Hizballah networks.

    Financial Crimes OFAC Department of Treasury Sanctions

    Share page with AddThis
  • OFAC identifies non-U.S. financial institutions on new list of banks facing correspondent account sanctions

    Financial Crimes

    On March 14, the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced the introduction of the List of Foreign Financial Institutions Subject to Correspondent Account or Payable-Through Account Sanctions (CAPTA list). The CAPTA list will identify foreign financial institutions that are prohibited from opening or maintaining correspondent or payable-through accounts in the U.S. pursuant to sanctions including the Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, North Korea Sanctions Regulations, Iranian Financial Sanctions Regulations, and the Hizballah International Financing Prevention Act of 2015. Certain regulations have also been amended to reflect the issuance of the new list. OFAC notes that the CAPTA list, which is separate from the Specially Designated Nationals List, will identify the specific prohibitions or strict conditions to which foreign financial institutions are subject. Non-U.S. financial institutions engaging in activity targeted under the above-mentioned regulations risk being added to the CAPTA list.

    Financial Crimes Of Interest to Non-US Persons OFAC Department of Treasury Sanctions

    Share page with AddThis

Pages