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  • Spotlight on Auto Finance (Part One of Three): A New Road for Auto Finance Companies

    Consumer Finance

    Auto Finance Attorney John Redding

    Traditionally, non-bank lenders looked to the states and the FTC for industry regulations. But, this has changed with the introduction of the CFPB. Recent reports show that the federal government is stepping up efforts to regulate and review auto finance companies, many of whom have never been subject to bank-style examinations.

    “The CFPB has created a new layer of regulation,” according to John Redding, Counsel in the Southern California office of BuckleySandler. “Auto lenders have to be alert and aware of their fair and responsible lending risks.”

    Redding says one of the ways to minimize these risks is to be proactive when reviewing a company’s policies, procedures, discretionary underwriting and pricing practices.  The CFPB is likely to conduct statistical reviews for loans that the company has made or purchased to ensure there is no unexplained or improper disparity between protected and non-protected classes , so companies should consider performing such analyses in advance of the regulator conducting such an analysis.

    “This will help mitigate risks for the companies by identifying areas that may present risk and allowing them to proactively take steps to modify policies and practices. When the regulators are conducting an exam, companies will have to explain why the business is conducted as it is, including steps taken to ensure fair and responsible lending to all consumers, regardless of status, and address any issues that may arise,” says Redding.

    The bottom line: Recognize that there are new regulators and more scrutiny on the industry and begin taking steps to perform these important reviews now.

    Redding suggests the following steps auto finance companies can take to prepare for the CFPB:

    • Evaluate the institution’s risk profile and prepare an operations and compliance strategy
    • Update policies and procedures (review CFPB exam guidelines)
    • Monitor, address, and retain records regarding consumer complaints
    • Monitor third-party sources of complaints
    • Appoint an ombudsman
    • Conduct internal audits
    • Consider patterns and practices that emerge regarding operations
    • Focus on areas that may lead to consumer harm, as well as technical violations
    • Include the compliance team to monitor, analyze and advise on specific proposals

    CFPB Auto Finance John Redding

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  • Buckley Sandler Files Amicus Brief on Behalf of Industry Groups in Tenth Circuit TILA Case

    Lending

    On May 3, BuckleySandler filed an amicus brief on behalf of three industry trade groups in a Tenth Circuit case addressing the right to rescind a mortgage under the Truth in Lending Act. The CFPB previously filed an amicus brief in Rosenfield v. HSBC Bank, No. 10-1442 (10th Cir.), in which it argued that borrowers who do not receive certain TILA-required disclosures should be permitted to rescind so long as they notify their lenders within three years—even if they did not file suit within TILA’s three-year repose period. The industry amicus brief, filed on behalf of the American Bankers Association, Consumer Bankers Association, and Consumer Mortgage Coalition, urges the Tenth Circuit to hold that TILA’s statute of repose requires that any right of rescission expire three years after origination even if the consumer previously notified the lender. The industry amicus brief argues that holding otherwise contravenes the purpose of TILA's statute of repose and creates unnecessary uncertainty that will negatively affect the industry and consumers alike.

    CFPB TILA

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  • Lawmakers Request CFPB Budget Details

    Consumer Finance

    On May 2, Republican members of the House Financial Services Committee sent a letter to CPFB Director Cordray following up on their initial request and the CFPB’s response, seeking additional details regarding the CFPB’s budget and plans. Although Congress does not appropriate funds to the CFPB, the members argue that the CFPB still must provide the committee with detailed budget information.  The CFPB, according to the letter, cannot act as other non-appropriated federal banking regulators because the CFPB budget impacts the national debt while the others do not. In an attempt to exercise some oversight over CFPB spending, the members seek (i) a financial operating plan for the agency; (ii) a detailed fiscal year 2013 budget justification, (iii) performance measures, (iv) a commitment to notify Congress prior to seeking funds from the Federal Reserve Board, (v) information about the CFPB headquarters design and renovation, and (vi) the process for determining employment needs.

    CFPB

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  • CFPB Announces Director of Diversity Office, Outlines Planned Activities

    Consumer Finance

    In a quarterly securities filing made on December 9, Analogic Corp. (Analogic), a Massachusetts-based manufacturer of airport security equipment, disclosed that the SEC and DOJ have made separate proposals to end their FCPA investigations into the company (see pages 26-27) that would include payments totaling approximately $15 million. The company had previously announced in a September 2015 press release that it had offered the SEC $1.6 million to settle the SEC’s FCPA investigation of the company.  Analogic’s 10-Q disclosed that the SEC rejected that offer.  The company stated that it remains in discussion with the SEC and DOJ about settlement and is also discussing a settlement with the Danish government concerning a resolution of these matters.

    As described in a prior FCPA Scorecard post, Analogic previously reported that the DOJ and SEC had “substantially” completed their investigations of potential bribery involving transactions by the company’s Danish subsidiary, BK Medical ApS.  The transactions at issue involved distributors paying BK Medical more than was owed, and BK Medical then allegedly transferring the excess money to third parties identified by the distributors.  At the time of its 2011 disclosure of the potentially problematic transactions, the company stated that it had not ascertained the ultimate beneficiaries or purpose of the transfers.

    CFPB Dodd-Frank

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  • FDIC Issues Statement Regarding Applicability of CFPB Mortgage Compensation Rules

    Lending

    On April 17, the FDIC issued Financial Institution Letter 2012-02 to apply the recent CFPB guidance on compensation for mortgage originators to FDIC-regulated institutions.  The statement directs covered institutions to ensure that their policies and practices are consistent with the compensation rules as interpreted by the CFPB.

    FDIC CFPB Mortgage Origination

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  • CFPB Begins Study of Arbitration Clauses, Extends Comment Period for Overdraft Inquiry

    Consumer Finance

    On April 24, the CFPB released a request for information to inform its study of the use and impact of arbitration clauses in consumer financial services agreements. Through June 23, 2012, the CFPB is seeking information from the public regarding (i) the prevalence of use of these arbitration clauses, (ii) what claims consumers bring in arbitration against financial services companies, (iii) whether claims are brought by financial services companies against consumers in arbitration, and (iv) how consumers and companies are affected by actual arbitrations and outside of actual arbitrations. The study is required by the Dodd-Frank Act and must be completed before the CFPB can begin exercising its Dodd-Frank authority to conduct rulemakings regarding arbitration agreements. Therefore, at this time the CFPB is not seeking comments on whether and how the use of such agreements should be regulated.

    The CFPB also this week extended through June 29, 2012, the comment period for its inquiry into overdraft programs and their costs, benefits, and risks to consumers.

    CFPB Dodd-Frank Arbitration

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  • CFPB Clarifies Transitional Licensing for Mortgage Loan Originators

    Lending

    On April 19, the CFPB issued Bulletin 2012-05 to clarify issues related to the transitional licensing of mortgage loan originators under the SAFE Act and Regulation H. According to the Bulletin, (i) states are allowed to provide a transitional license to an individual with a valid license from another state, but (ii) states are prohibited from providing a transitional license for a registered loan originator who leaves a federally regulated financial institution to act as a loan originator while pursuing a state license.

    CFPB Mortgage Licensing Mortgage Origination

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  • CFPB Files Briefs in Three TILA Actions

    Lending

    Analogic Corp., a manufacturer of airport security equipment, offered the SEC $1.6 million to settle the agency’s FCPA investigation of the company, according to a company press release.  The company previously reported that the DOJ and SEC had “substantially” completed their investigations of potential bribery involving transactions by the company’s Danish subsidiary, BK Medical ApS.  The transactions at issue involved distributors paying BK Medical more than was owed, and then BK Medical transferring the excess money to third parties identified by the distributors.  At the time of its 2011 disclosure of the potentially problematic transactions, the company stated that it had not ascertained the ultimate beneficiaries or purpose of the transfers.  According to the company it had not yet engaged in similar settlement discussions with the DOJ or Danish government.

    CFPB TILA

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  • CFPB Puts Consumer Lenders on Notice Regarding Discriminatory Practices

    Consumer Finance

    The CFPB today put consumer lenders on notice that it “will use all available legal avenues, including disparate impact, to pursue lenders whose practices discriminate against consumers.” The CFPB intends to employ disparate impact when examining auto lenders, credit card issuers , student lenders, mortgage lenders, and other providers of consumer credit, allowing the CFPB to claim an institution has engaged in discriminatory lending based on the effects and not the intent of the lending practices. In remarks to the National Community Reinvestment Coalition today, CFPB Director Richard Cordray stated that “[t]he consequences of ‘disparate impact’ discrimination are very real and they affect consumers just as significantly as other forms of discrimination.” To help consumers identify and avoid credit discrimination, the CFPB also compiled and released new lending discrimination “tips and warning signs.”

    Concurrent with the announcement, the CFPB published Bulletin 2012-04 to specifically reaffirm its commitment to applying  disparate impact when conducting supervision and examination under the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) and its implementing regulation, Regulation B. In support of this application, the CFPB cites what it refers to as the “consensus approach” outlined by a 1994 interagency Policy Statement on Discrimination in Lending, which notes court findings that discriminatory lending in violation of ECOA can be established through (i) overt evidence of discrimination, (ii) evidence of disparate treatment, and (iii) evidence of disparate impact. The CFPB also argues that the ECOA legislative history, as characterized in the original Regulation B adopted by the Federal Reserve Board, supports application of the disparate impact doctrine.

    Credit Cards CFPB Nonbank Supervision Auto Finance Fair Lending

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  • CFPB Previews Mortgage Servicing Rules

    Lending

    On April 9, the CFPB previewed its upcoming mortgage servicing rules, which likely will be proposed this summer and finalized in January 2013. The key aspects of the proposal relate broadly to (i) monthly mortgage statements, (ii) ARM adjustment disclosures, (iii) force-placed insurance, (iv) payment crediting, (v) error resolution and borrower inquiries, and (vi) borrower outreach and borrower information. The majority of the details were provided in an outline prepared for a Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act (SBREFA) panel, which will consider the potential impact of the planned rules on small businesses. The outline includes model forms related to periodic statements, ARM reset notices, and force-placed insurance notices, which the CFPB has been testing in recent months. The CFPB release also included questions directed to the small entity representatives in order to assist the SBREFA panel in understanding the potential economic impacts of the particular proposals under consideration by the CFPB. Generally, the servicing proposals incorporate statutory changes imposed by the Dodd-Frank Act, which would go into effect in January 2013 unless final rules are issued on or before that date. The concepts in the proposal that do not address specific Dodd-Frank requirements are consistent with servicing requirements imposed by recent mortgage servicing consent orders and/or recent requirements for servicing delinquent loans owned by or serviced on behalf of Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac (see, e.g., Federal Reserve Board Consent Orders and Fannie Mae Ann. SVC 2011-08R).

    CFPB Fannie Mae Federal Reserve Mortgage Servicing

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